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Update: Defunct Links to/in the FAQ-niverse!

Greetings, fellow travelers!

With special thanks to Claire Rebouche for bringing this to my attention, it appears that the links to the new ligature risk FAQs that appeared in this week’s blog post no longer direct you to the content of the latest information (I swear to you that the links were working Monday), but rather direct you to the FAQ homepage. Now, that wouldn’t be such an awful thing if the latest FAQ (for the record, TJC describes it thusly: “Ligature Risks – Assessing and Mitigating Risk For Suicide and Self-Harm”) were readily discernible, but alas (at least for the moment), this particular FAQ is among the missing.

Rest assured, top people are working on trying to find out what’s going on, and hopefully this is but a temporary circumstance (I figure if we can’t find the information, the surveyors might be having a tough time as well—helps to level the playing field). One other thing to note is that where previously the ligature-related FAQs could be found in the EC section of the FAQ homepage, they’ve all been moved to the NPSG section (and, interestingly enough, increased the number of FAQs dealing with ligatures to just over 20), so you may want to keep an eye on any changes in that section (from a practical standpoint, I understand the shift, but I don’t know that they couldn’t have shown up in both sections as a transition, though perhaps they did—I don’t spend a lot of time monitoring the NPSG section of the FAQ page).

At any rate, what I suspect may be happening is that, in their efforts to “clean up” the FAQ page, it would seem that some of the internal links are no longer working, so I’m hoping that we’re just working through a funky transition period and everything will be up and running soon.

That said, there are a couple of other new items relative to the management of this at-risk patient population that I want to share (while they are still available): this one and this other one, which deal with how the process for managing at-risk patients can result in catastrophic gaps in care. I think they’re pretty straightforward in terms of information, but with everything else going on this week, I would encourage you to check ’em out sooner rather than later.

One size fits all…or one size fits none

In a world in which the economies of scale don’t always economize, I keep running into situations and/or conditions that result from trying to make something do too much. The classic example (other than those one-size-fits-all bunny suits in ORs across this great land of ours—I always end up looking like late-model Elvis, Vegas edition) is the temperature log that is used for food refrigerators, medication refrigerators, etc. As a general rule of thumb, unless the temperature range for each of the refrigerators being monitored is the same (and never mind trying to mix Fahrenheit and Celsius), then you are just asking for trouble. “Pushing” staff to have to discern between competing “out of range” temperature values requires an almost infinite amount of attention, and while there is, in certain instances, some overlap (food is usually 33-40 degrees F and medication 36-46 degrees F, so 36-40 works for both), it just makes so much more sense to limit confusion to the extent possible. And, to my mind, that means individualized temperature logs. One quick note regarding temperature logs for freezers, if your log doesn’t have a temperature “safe” range clearly indicated, I’ve been seeing a lot of mix-ups regarding those pesky negative numbers. For instance, if you establish a target of -15 degrees or colder, -10 degrees would be considered an -out-of-range value, but in talking with the folks doing the monitoring, they “think” of “10” being less that “15,” kind of missing the whole negative number dynamic. I won’t say that this is happening everywhere, but I have run into it in a couple of instances, so that’s something to keep an eye on.

Turning to the Oddities page, I was cruising through The Joint Commission’s FAQ page (admittedly, looking for blog fodder) and came across something of a puzzle; in the text of the FAQ dealing with the “old” requirement of the building assessment as a function of the Statement of Conditions (the old Part 3, which is no longer available) and has not been since 2007. But if you look at the text of LS.01.01.01, the second performance element indicates that a building assessment is required (at time frames to be determined by each organization) to determine compliance with the Life Safety chapter of the Joint Commission manual. I guess the thing that struck me about this happenstance is that the FAQ would have a good opportunity to indicate that the building assessment has evolved (or mutated—your pick) into its present day purpose  as an exercise in assessing your building for compliance with the LS chapter. Maybe they just haven’t gotten around to updating this FAQ (it is a ways down the FAQ page), and I suppose it is no more than a curiosity.

Like the dust that settles all around me: I got those low-down TJC FAQ blues

I don’t know if there’s anything to be inferred by the fact that the latest updates on the ligature resistance front are “buried” on p. 8 of the May 2019 Perspectives (after an onslaught of what I characterize as Joint Commission advertisements), but it would be nice to think that perhaps folks are going to be allowed to move on at their own “pace” as a function of risk assessments, abatement and mitigation strategies and monitoring for gaps in safety, but I guess we shall see what we shall see.

At any rate, the May Perspectives (on p. 8—imagine that!) provides two topics, one of which, video monitoring we discussed a few weeks back (I guess they like to repurpose content as much as anyone…) and a clarification on the (admittedly somewhat awkwardly worded) requirement that self-closing and self-locking (both, not one or the other) doors are required for the separation of areas required to be ligature resistant and those that are not, with the intent being to eliminate reliance on staff to close and lock those doors to prevent patient harm. The FAQ also prohibits the use of hold-open devices of any kind on these doors, so do keep that in mind. This applies to “staff controlled” areas on a behavioral health unit, like med rooms, utility rooms, consult rooms, etc. This is all based on Recommendation #1 published in the November 2017 Perspectives and the guidance that patient rooms, patient bathrooms, corridors, and common patient areas are to be ligature resistant. If this is news to you (I don’t know that we’ve discussed this particular piece of the puzzle), I can’t say that I am surprised as it really didn’t stand out at the time and really required too much in the way of cogitation to figure out what they were getting at, particularly the descriptor (“Nursing stations with an unobstructed view (so that a patient attempt at self-harm at the nursing station would be easily seen and interrupted) and areas behind self-closing/self-locking doors do not need to be ligature-resistant and will not be cited for ligature risks.”) as it was probably a little too all-inclusive. I think I would have separated them into two bullet points:

  • Nursing stations with an unobstructed view
  • Areas behind self-closing/self-locking doors

But hey, as long as we get there in the end, right? Yeah, sure, fine…

In other news, ASHRAE is in the public comment process relative to proposed changes to ASHRAE 170 Standard for Ventilation of Health Care Facilities (you can see the proposed draft here). Given that NFPA 99 defers to ASHRAE on the ventilation front, I can’t help but think that this is going to continue to be a cornerstone compliance document during survey activities. I don’t know that I noted anything particularly egregious, etc., in the proposed update, but I always try to encourage the folks in the field to review and weigh in when these things are open for comment. Before we got to ligature-resistant considerations, the management of procedural environments as it relates to temperature, humidity, air pressure relationships, etc. was the hot-button topic, so any changes might have a similar impact on the industry. Unfortunately, I just got wind of this last week and the comment period ends May 6, so act fast!