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’Tis the season…for more emergency management goodness!

Recognizing the somewhat hyperbolic nature of this week’s headline (you need only listen to current news/weather feeds to be able to determine that emergencies are not quite as seasonal as perhaps they once were…), I did want to share one more emergency management-related nugget with you (I do try to mix things up, but until I start seeing some “hard” survey results—or some regulatory panjandrum makes some sort of announcement, I’m going to keep seeding this space with various and sundry bits of stuff), this coming to us from the left coast, aka California.

While I have little doubt that you Californians in the audience are familiar with the California Department of Public Health (CDPH—four scary letters, though perhaps not as scary as OSHPD for the facilities folks in Cali) requirements for workplace emergency plans (which is highlighted in this month’s CDPH Occupational Health Watch), I think that there might well be some useful information for folks in other parts of the country (I have found, over some few years of experience, that regulatory tsunamis can start in California and find their way to all manner of locales). To be honest (and why else would we be here?), the plan elements required (or at least the ones the surveyors want to see) by the usual regulatorily-inclined suspects, are frequently not quite as useful from an operational preparedness/mitigation/response/recovery standpoint (they provide a useful structure for the aforementioned quartet, but when it comes down to doing the do, again, sometimes not so much).

At any rate, the Cal/OSHA Emergency Action Plan requirements, provide (at least in my mind—feel free to disagree) a good basic sense of the pieces to have in place that are not necessarily as patient-focused. When the fecal matters starts impacting the rapidly rotation turbine blades, it’s important to have a structure in place that addresses the employee aspect, particularly for those of you with offsite non-clinical operations (billing, finance, HR, etc.: a lot of folks don’t have enough space at the main campus for all the moving pieces that constitute a healthcare organization). So, here’s the California stuff (and please feel free to share any good stuff your state might have on the books—this is all about getting prepared and staying prepared—every little bit helps):

(b) Elements. The following elements, at a minimum, shall be included in the plan:

(1) Procedures for emergency evacuation, including type of evacuation and exit route assignments;

(2) Procedures to be followed by employees who remain to operate critical plant operations before they evacuate;

(3) Procedures to account for all employees after emergency evacuation has been completed;

(4) Procedures to be followed by employees performing rescue or medical duties;

(5) The preferred means of reporting fires and other emergencies; and

(6) Names or regular job titles of persons or departments who can be contacted for further information or explanation of duties under the plan.

(c) Alarm System.

(1) The employer shall establish an employee alarm system which complies with Article 165 (link to that info here).

(2) If the employee alarm system is used for alerting fire brigade members, or for other purposes, a distinctive signal for each purpose shall be used.

(d) Evacuation. The employer shall establish in the emergency action plan the types of evacuation to be used in emergency circumstances.

(e) Training.

(1) Before implementing the emergency action plan, the employer shall designate and train a sufficient number of persons to assist in the safe and orderly emergency evacuation of employees.

(2) The employer shall advise each employee of his/her responsibility under the plan at the following times:

(A) Initially when the plan is developed,

(B) Whenever the employee’s responsibilities or designated actions under the plan change, and

(C) Whenever the plan is changed.

(3) The employer shall review with each employee upon initial assignment those parts of the plan which the employee must know to protect the employee in the event of an emergency. The written plan shall be kept at the workplace and made available for employee review. For those employers with 10 or fewer employees the plan may be communicated orally to employees and the employer need not maintain a written plan.


I hope this provides you with some useful (and perhaps even thoughtful) information as we roll through emergency year 2018. I am hoping for a time of minimal impact for communities this year (I think we had just about enough last year), but the oddness of the weather patterns over the past couple of months gives me pause. (I live in the Boston area and Houston and its environs had snow before we did!)

Emergency Management Monkeyshines: All Things Must Pass…

Sometimes like a kidney stone, but nonetheless…

Before we dive into this week’s “content,” I have a thought for you to ponder as to the nature of basing future survey results on the results of surveys past (rather Dickensian, the results of surveys past): Recognizing that authorities having jurisdiction (AHJ) always reserve the right to disagree with any decision you’ve ever made or, indeed, anything they (or any other AHJ) have told you in the past, how long are existing waivers and/or equivalencies good for? Hopefully this ponderable will not visit itself upon you or your organization, but one must be prepared for any (and every) eventuality. Which neatly brings us to:

In digging around past emails and such, I noticed that I had not visited the Department of Health and Human Services Healthcare Emergency Preparedness Gateway in rather a while and what to my wondering eyes should appear but some updated info and a link to CMS that I think you’ll find useful. So, the current headlines/topics:

  • Considerations for the Use of Temporary Care Locations for Managing Seasonal Patient Surge
  • Pediatric Issues in Disasters Webinar
  • 2017 Hurricane Response – Resources for Children with Special Health Care Needs
  • Supporting Non-resident/Foreign Citizen Patients
  • A new issue of The Exchange newsletter
  • A link to the CMS Emergency Preparedness Final Rule surveyor training (you can find the information available to providers here). Unfortunately, the post-test is not available to providers, but sometimes it’s like that.

It is my intent over the next little while to check out the education package, so I will let you know if I have any grave reservations about the content, etc., or if I think you need to earmark it for priority viewing.

So, kind of brief this week, but I’m sure there’ll be more to discuss in the not too distant future. And so, with the end of wintah on the horizon, I wish you a moderately temperate week!

Oh, what fresh hell is this?

Much as 2016 has laid waste to the pantheon of pop culture, so has it decimated the status quo in the realm of facilities and safety management. While this year has brought “pleasures” expected (adoption of the 2012 edition of the Life Safety Code®) and unexpected (the demise of the Plan for Improvement process), it appears that the wheels (gears?) that drive this regulatory machine are not yet done churning out new stuff for us to ponder.

As you’ve probably heard by now, last week CMS finally dropped the mike on the federal requirements relating to emergency management and the healthcare world. (Press release can be found here; link to the final rule–the hospital requirements start on p. 584 of this oh so fabulous 651-page document. Monsieur Needle, please meet Monsieur Haystack…zut alors!)

Let’s do a quick run-through of the four primary components:

  • You have to have an emergency preparedness plan that must be reviewed and updated at least annually.
    • The plan must be based on, and include, a documented facility-based and community-based risk assessment, utilizing an all-hazards approach.
    • The plan must include strategies for addressing emergency events identified by the risk assessment, utilizing an all-hazards approach.
    • The plan must address patient population, including, but not limited to, persons at-risk; the type of services the hospital has ability to provide in an emergency; and continuity of operations, including delegations of authority and succession plans.
    • The plan must include a process for cooperation with the various AHJs’ efforts to maintain an integrated response during a disaster or emergency situation, including documentation of the hospital’s efforts to contact such officials, and when applicable, its participation in collaborative and cooperative planning efforts.
  • Develop emergency preparedness policies and procedures that must be reviewed and updated at least annually. The policies and procedures must address the following:
    • The provision of subsistence needs for staff and patients, whether they evacuate or shelter in place, include, but are not limited to the following:
      • Food, water, medical, and pharmaceutical supplies.
      • Alternate sources of energy to maintain the following:
        • Temperatures to protect patient health and safety and for the safe and sanitary storage of provisions.
        • Emergency lighting.
        • Fire detection, extinguishing, and alarm systems.
        • Sewage and waste disposal.
        • A system to track the location of on-duty staff and sheltered patients in the hospital’s care during an emergency. If on-duty staff and sheltered patients are relocated during the emergency, the hospital must document the specific name and location of the receiving facility or other location.
        • Safe evacuation from the hospital, which includes consideration of care and treatment needs of evacuees; staff responsibilities; transportation; identification of evacuation location(s); and primary and alternate means of communication with external sources of assistance.
        • A means to shelter in place for patients, staff, and volunteers who remain in the facility.
        • A system of medical documentation that preserves patient information, protects confidentiality of patient information, and secures and maintains the availability of records.
        • The use of volunteers in an emergency and other emergency staffing strategies, including the process and role for integration of State and Federally designated healthcare professionals to address surge needs during an emergency.
        • The development of arrangements with other hospitals and other providers to receive patients in the event of limitations or cessation of operations to maintain the continuity of services to hospital patients.
        • The role of the hospital under a waiver declared by the Secretary, in accordance with section 1135 of the Act, in the provision of care and treatment at an alternate care site identified by emergency management officials.
      • Develop and maintain an emergency preparedness communication plan that must be reviewed and updated at least annually, which includes names and contact information for the following:
        • Staff
        • Entities providing services under arrangement
        • Patients’ physicians
        • Other hospitals and CAHs
        • Volunteers
      • The communications plan must also include contact information for the following:
        • Federal, state, tribal, regional, and local emergency preparedness staff
        • Other sources of assistance
      • The communications plan must identify primary and alternate means for communicating with the following:
        • Hospital’s staff
        • Federal, state, tribal, regional, and local emergency management agencies
      • The communications plan must provide a method for sharing information and medical documentation for patients under the hospital’s care, as necessary, with other healthcare providers to maintain the continuity of care.
      • The communications plan must provide a means, in the event of an evacuation, to release patient information as permitted under 45 CFR 164.510(b)(1)(ii).
      • The communications plan must provide a means of providing information about the general condition and location of patients under the facility’s care as permitted under 45 CFR 164.510(b)(4).
      • The communications plan must provide a means of providing information about the hospital’s occupancy, needs, and its ability to provide assistance, to the authority having jurisdiction, the Incident Command Center, or designee.
    • Develop and maintain an emergency preparedness training and testing program that is reviewed and updated at least annually.
      • The training program must provide for:
        • Initial training in emergency preparedness policies and procedures to all new and existing staff, individuals providing services under arrangement, and volunteers, consistent with their expected role
        • Emergency preparedness training at least annually
        • Maintenance of documentation of the training
        • Demonstration of staff knowledge of emergency procedures
      • The testing program must provide for:
        • Participation in a full-scale exercise that is community-based or when a community-based exercise is not accessible, an individual, facility-based. If the hospital experiences an actual natural or man-made emergency that requires activation of the emergency plan, the hospital is exempt from engaging in a community-based or individual, facility-based full-scale exercise for one year following the onset of the actual event.
      • Conduction of an additional exercise that may include, but is not limited to the following:
        • A second full-scale exercise that is community-based or individual, facility-based
        • A tabletop exercise that includes a group discussion led by a facilitator, using a narrated, clinically-relevant emergency scenario, and a set of problem statements, directed messages, or prepared questions designed to challenge an emergency plan
      • Analysis of the hospital’s response to and maintain documentation of all drills, tabletop exercises, and emergency events, and revise the hospital’s emergency plan, as needed.

To be honest, at first blush, I don’t see anything of particularly dire consequence (feel free to disagree; I’m always up for some civil—or uncivil—discourse) unless you’ve done a less-than-complete job of documenting your communications with the various and sundry AHJs (“The plan must include a process for cooperation with the various AHJs’ efforts to maintain an integrated response during a disaster or emergency situation, including documentation of the hospital’s efforts to contact such officials, and when applicable, its participation in collaborative and cooperative planning efforts.”). In fact, it will be interesting to see if TJC backs off of their caveat that tabletops don’t count towards the annual exercise requirement though, as you can see, the tabletop must include some very specific elements.

There is some additional language relating to provisions for stand-by and emergency power that includes providing for generator locations when you build new or renovate (who wants an emergency generator that could end up under water?); maintaining fuel sources during an emergency; testing components in accordance with requirements, etc., but, again, I’m not seeing a lot of indigestion-inciting language. I suppose it is possible that, at the end of all this (I mean, what’s left to tweak), there will be enough certainty in the regulatory fabric to promote a consistent application of the standards, etc. during surveys. Wouldn’t that be nice…

Where will you be when the lights go out?

Now I don’t think that there’s any here among us who would be inclined to disagree with that as a going concern. The question I have is how might these requirements come into play when CMS adopts the 2012 edition of the Life Safety Code®? We know that CMS is looking very carefully at all things relating to emergency management/preparedness, including a fair amount of focus on the subject of emergency power. I think we can safely intuit that the broad-ish concept of grandfathering is fast becoming extinct. Thus, the question becomes (or perhaps this is really representative of two questions) what could be done now (and perhaps mandated to be done now) to reduce any existing EPSS installations that could be considered at risk (I’m presuming that you’ve all completed your risk assessments in this regard—if you haven’t, I think it would be a wicked swell idea to be jumping on that bandwagon ASAP)? The second prong being, what due diligence has been brought to bear in relation to any pending installations? I’m pretty certain that I would not want to have a brand spanking new generator get flooded out during the next deluge. At any rate, I am interested in finding out more about what you folks have been up to in this regard. I can’t imagine any endeavors in this realm having an inexpensive price tag, so I’m thinking about how folks might have had to, or will have to, sell these “ideas” to organizational leadership.

Get the heck out of there!

Touching back on the proposed CMS rule regarding emergency preparedness and hospitals, within the torrent of verbiage, the Federal Register information refers to a hospital evacuation decision guide that’s available through the AHRQ website (just so you know, there is a fairly gloomy caution that the information may be out of date, etc. I’m extremely glad that CMS is using potentially outdated information to promulgate new requirements. Perhaps that’s a wee bit too ironic…). In looking over the materials, I don’t know that the contents are so woefully out of date as to be useless. On the contrary, I think there’s a lot of helpful stuff; while there have been some evacuation-worthy events since June 2011 when this information was last vetted for currency, I’m thinking that the historical precedents in place at the time (Katrina, etc.) would drive a refinement of planning and preparedness as opposed to a wholesale revamping of concepts relating to evacuation of hospitals in response to emergencies.

Have folks out there been using this information? If so, has it been of particular use? Inquiring minds want to know!

It was the worst of times, it was the worst of times—or perhaps not

It appears that we are soon to be basking in the presence of an interesting confluence. It appears that CMS is looking very closely at requiring hospitals to conduct four-hour generator tests every year. Don’t know that that is a particularly surprising development given the focus on the reliability of emergency power, though I’m not sure how much the brain trust for NFPA 110 was consulted in this regard. At any rate, you will definitely want to take a look at the Federal Register for December 27, 2013 for the proposed rules (the emergency generator piece can be found on pages 79173-4, but the whole proposed rule has to do with hospitals and emergency preparedness; I suspect we’ll be chatting about this stuff for a while). Go to the Federal Register webpage where you can download the PDF of the proposed rule (and get yourself some snacks, it’s 120 pages long). The comment period ends on February 25, so you might want to get in on the action, the options for commenting are on the webpage.

Moving on to the other piece of this lovely regulatory (governmental?) maelstrom, we have the EPA, which is enacting fairly significant requirements for emergency generator emissions (you can find a story on this topic from Health Facilities Management magazine). You can find more information about the specifics of the emissions requirements at the EPA website.

It appears that we will be looking at additional generator testing with stricter emissions requirements—sounds like way too much fun!


Alien invasion: Take me to your (Emergency Management) leader!

It’s been a fairly busy year when it comes to updates of standards and such (short of the anticipated adoption of the 2012 Life Safety Code®…as Tom Petty once noted, the waiting is the hardest part, but I digress) and this week we’ll take a look at the new requirements relative to leadership and oversight of the Emergency Management (EM) function. I’m still not entirely certain what we’re gaining by this, unless as a means of ensuring that organizational leadership is inclined to provide sufficient resources to the task of being appropriately prepared for emergencies, but I’m sure it will all be made clear in the fullness of time.

So, we start with LD.04.01.05 which (in EP 5) mandates hospital leaders to identify an individual (and it does say “individual,” not the usual “individual(s)”—sounds like only one person’s going to be on the hook for this) to be accountable for matters of EM that are not within the responsibilities of the incident commander role. This includes such processes as staff implementation of the four phases of EM (mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery); staff implementation of EM across the six critical areas (communications, resources and assets, safety and security, staff roles and responsibilities, utilities, and patient clinical and support activities); collaboration across clinical and operational areas relative to EM; and collaboration with the community relative to EM stuff. I think that’s pretty straightforward and, to be honest, I can’t say that I’ve run into any organizations that have not taken things to this level.

Next up we have LD.04.04.01. EP 25, which ties hospital senior leadership in as the drivers of EM improvements across the organization, including prioritization of improvement opportunities, as well as a specific review of EM planning reviews (a review of the review, if you will) and a review of the emergency response plan (exercises and real events) evaluations. So this speaks to a very specific communications process from the “boots on the ground” EM resources up to senior leadership. This one is very doable and even “done-able” if you’ve been including consideration of EM program evaluations as a function of your annual evaluation of the Environment of Care Management program. Lots of folks are doing this, so this one’s not so much of a stretch.

Finally, we have EM.03.01.03, EPs 13 and 15, which basically establish the requirement to have a specific process for the evaluation of EM exercises and actual response activities. You’re doing this, I am quite certain, but what you might not be succinctly documenting is the multidisciplinary aspect of the evaluation process (don’t forget to include those licensed independent practitioners—we want them at the table). It goes on to the process for reporting the results of the exercise/event evaluations to the EOC committee. Again, I’m pretty confident that this is in place for many (probably most, maybe even all) folks.

That’s the scoop on this. The changes are effective January 1, 2014 and I don’t think this is going to present much of a problem for folks, though please feel free to disagree (if you are so inclined). Certainly what’s being required fits into the framework of processes and activities that are already in place, so less fraught with peril than other changes that could have been made. (I’m still waiting for the influx exercise requirement to be changed to an evacuation exercise requirement. I think we do influx pretty well; evacuation, that’s a whole other kettle of fish.)

Well, while I don’t think that you’d have to include alien invasion on your HVA, if such a thing were to occur, at least we’ll know who to take them to when they ask…

He ain’t HVA, he’s my opportunity

An interesting topic came across my desk relative to a January 2013 survey, and it pertains to the use of your HVA process as a means of driving staff education initiatives.

During the Emergency Management interview session during this particular survey, the surveyor wanted to know about the organization’s hazard vulnerability analysis (HVA) process and how it worked. So, that’s pretty normal—there are lots of ways to administer the HVA process—I prefer the consensus route, but that’s me.

But then the follow-up question was “How do you use the HVA to educate staff and their actions to take?” Now, when I first looked at that, I was thinking that the HVA process is designed more as a means of prioritizing response activities, resource allocations, and communications to local, regional, and other emergency response agencies, etc., but staff education? Not really sure about that…

But the more I considered the more I thought to myself, if you’re going to look at vulnerability as a true function of preparedness, then you would have to include the education of staff to their roles and responsibilities during an emergency as a critical metric in evaluating that level of preparedness. The HVA not only should tell you where you are now, but also give you a sense of where you need to take things to make improvements and from those improvements, presumably there will be some element of staff education. A question I like to ask of folks is: “What is the emergency that you are most likely to experience for which you are least prepared?” Improvement does not usually reside in things you already do well/frequently. It’s generally the stuff that you don’t get to practice as often that can be problematic during real-life events. One example is the management of volunteer practitioners—this can be a fairly involved process. But if you haven’t practiced it during an exercise, there may be complexities that will get in the way of being able to appropriately respond during the emergency. Which is why I recommend if you haven’t practiced running a couple of folks through the volunteer process, what better time than during an exercise?

Excellence amid chaos: A word from the land of the bean and the cod

If I might beg your indulgence, I just wanted to take a moment to recognize the herculean efforts of the Boston hospital community during last week’s bombing at the Boston Marathon. All too often, when disaster strikes, hospitals don’t receive many kudos—I guess the expectation is that hospitals are always ready for the worst (true, that).

Over the last decade or so as a consultant, I have had the opportunity to work with many of the folks who were charged with coordinating response and, to be honest, the level and nature of response from the hospitals in Boston was no great surprise to me. While Marathon Monday is certainly a “big” date on the preparedness calendar for Boston hospitals, I’ve seen a lot of the work behind the scenes and can only be impressed by the commitment to preparedness on the part of so many.

But in saying that, I also recognize that, by and large (or at least the ones I’ve visited), I believe that hospitals in the United States are extraordinarily well-prepared to handle emergencies of virtually every stripe. That’s not to say that every response effort is absolutely perfect—but these folks learn from those “opportunities” and continue to improve their organizations’ ability to respond to emergencies.

I hope to have the opportunity to work with more of you folks in the future, but in closing, please join me in a tip of the cap to the hospital folks in Boston. I am extremely proud to have worked with some of you and proud of the efforts by all concerned!

Postscript: I penned the above prior to the successful law enforcement resolution to the bombing in Boston. It sounds like it’s going to be a while before we find out anything of use regarding the planning, etc., of this catastrophic event, but I think it’s certainly worth tipping the cap once again to the awesomely coordinated efforts of all levels of the law enforcement community.  I’m sure there will be ample Monday-morning quarterbacking relative to just about any decision/strategy involved in bringing this incident to a (sort of) close, but all I know is that it was a sizable measure of comfort when flying back home to Boston last Friday evening to know that the matter was in hand and Boston had resumed some semblance of normalcy. It was good to be home!