RSSAll Entries Tagged With: "clinical alarms"

Sound the alarm…no, wait, silence the alarm…no, wait—what?!?

Now that we have almost reached the summer solstice, I guess it’s time to start thinking/talking about 2016 and what it might bring from an accreditation perspective—it will be here almost before we know it (time flies when you’re having fun—and we’re having too much fun, are we not?)

One of the developments that I am watching with a bit of interest (if only because it is not at all clear how this is going to be administered in the field) is the next step in the clinical alarm National Patient Safety Goal (for those of you keeping score, that’s NPSG.06.01.01 if you need to find it in your accreditation manual—and I’m sure you’re sleeping with that under your pillow…). Presumably at this point, you have covered the elements that are in full surveyability—establishment of alarm system safety as an organizational priority (pretty simple, that one) and identification of the most important alarm signals based on:

  • input from medical staff and clinical departments (Have you got documentation for that?)
  • risk to patients if the alarm signal is not attended or if it malfunctions
  • whether specific alarm signals are needed or unnecessarily contribute to alarm noise and alarm fatigue
  • potential for patient harm based on internal incident history
  • published best practices and guidelines (Can you say AAMI and ECRI? Sure you can!)

Everyone out there in radioland should have this much of the package in place. Now, it’s time to do something with that process.

Starting January 1, 2016, each organization is on the hook for establishing policies and procedures for managing the alarms identified through the process noted above. The policies/procedures need to address elements such as clinically appropriate settings for alarm signals, when the alarms can be disabled; setting, changing and management of alarm parameters; monitoring and responding to alarm signals, etc. And, of course, we need to education staff and LIPs about the purpose and proper operation of alarm systems for which they are responsible (that’s a pretty good swath of education, I’m thinking).

At any rate, I’m curious about a couple of things—how are you folks coming with this process? And while I understand the importance of the safe use of clinical alarms, how much of a deal is this really? I completely recognize that in the zero tolerance world of healthcare in the 21st century, one event that traces back to an issue with the appropriate use, etc. of a clinical alarm is one too many events, particularly as a function of patient safety. Perhaps the question should be this: has mandating this process resulted in your hospital being safer? I know this is a “have to,” though there is certainly enough gray to allow for some customization of approach (I suspect that a cookie cutter approach is not the best strategy—too many different alarms in too many different environments), what’s this going to look like in the hands of our friends from Chicago when they darken our collective doors. If anyone has some feedback on how this is playing during survey, that would be wonderful, even if you just share the story with me (I’ll remove any identifying remarks), I (and the blogosphere) would be forever in your debt.

Happy Flag Week (it hardly seems reasonable to hold it to just a day)!

Clinical alarms: Getting the word out

All things being equal, I suspect that folks are wrestling with the very expansive elements of the Sentinel Event Alert regarding the management of medical device alarms (Sentinel Event Alert #50). I think the important thing to do is to first document a risk assessment that takes into account the various clinical alarm systems, identifying those that might legitimately be considered critical and use that as the starting point. I think it would behoove you to involve the folks in clinical engineering as they probably have performance data that would be very useful (equipment that they find during preventive maintenance activities that perhaps are not appropriately configured for audibility, etc.), it would also be important to include any potential occurrence reporting data that might indicate that there have been issues involving audibility of clinical alarms, etc. To be honest, I am not so sure that any one organization’s approach will be sufficiently universal to be used across the board beyond a simple “these are the specific risks involved with the clinical alarms you’ll be using” (in recognition that this may vary based on clinical location/service) and “these are the specific strategies we are using to appropriately eliminate/mitigate those risks.” I know that may sound like an overly simple approach, but if you do a good job on the risk assessment groundwork, you will have everything you need to manage the education process. As a further enticement, the Sentinel Event Alert web page noted above also includes links to a couple of podcasts that discuss the Alert in pretty fair detail. I don’t know that I’d recommend listening to it on the treadmill, but it’s probably a good way to combine work and exercise…