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Well that stinks! Or maybe it doesn’t…

I guess we can file this under the “You never know what’s going to pique someone’s interest” category.

In last week’s Joint Commission E-Alert publication, there is a featured set of links to an updated FAQ regarding “Aromatherapy & Essential Oils” (for example, this one). When I first saw it, I was thinking that maybe it was going to discuss some of the intricacies of dealing with all this smelly stuff that seems to crop up in offices and other spaces (everywhere looks like a good place for a stick-up). But when I clicked through the link, I found the question revolved around whether or not aromatherapy and/or essential oils needed to be managed as medications. As usual, the response was “it depends” (admittedly, that is a very much shortened version of their response, but please feel free to click through to embrace the majesty of this FAQ), with the slightly more involved response being “it depends on how you’re using it.” I have to say that I am not typically a fan of a lot of these scents; some of the them just seem like iffy attempts at covering other odors and some of them just seem wrong, but I digress. I know there are (perhaps more than) a few organizations that have adopted a fragrance-neutral/fragrance-free environment (these days, you just don’t know how someone is going to react to various scent-sations—allergies abound), but I can definitely see some folks interpreting this as something of an endorsement of using scents as a strategic intervention.

In other news, TJC also announced the publication of a new book of safety lists, which (based on my past experiences with their book products), may or may not be the answer to your sticky challenges (I pretty much live in the “not” camp, but someone wants to try and convince me that we have a winner, I’m game). Alternatively, you might consider the 2019 edition of the HCPro Hospital Safety Trainer Toolbox, which promises so much more than a bunch of checklists. I personally kind of ebb and flow on the whole concept of checklists, primarily because I find they try to do too much (or perhaps promise too much is the more appropriate descriptor). I see those checklists that go on and on for pages and pages and I’m thinking how in (insert deity of choice)’s name do you operationalize something that big? To that point, I am often asked what I look for when I’m doing consultant survey work and my (admittedly somewhat glib) response is that I don’t look for anything in particular, but rather I look at everything. I suspect it goes back to my EVS days when I looked at things from top to bottom in a (more or less) circular fashion—pretty much looking for stuff that didn’t look right (it is very rare indeed that I find an instance of noncompliance that looks “right,” if you know what I mean). The corollary to that is that a surveyor (and I count myself among that august assemblage) is never more dangerous than when they are standing still—that’s when the little funky detail stuff comes into focus. All the divots, loaded sprinkler heads, dust animals (bunnies, dinosaurs, the lot), become more visible. A moving surveyor (unlike the moving finger…) is a very good thing!

Healthcare Leadership Culture Moving Forward: What I (probably) didn’t do during my summer vacation

As a frequent traveler, I tend to read a fair amount in transit (my preferred operating system for reading is the traditional “hard copy”, aka “books” most often from the coffers of the public library), and in doing so, I try to mix in fiction and non-fiction titles. Also, as a function of traveling, I hear about a lot of stuff on the radio (usually the local NPR station—there’s almost one of those everywhere I go), which is not quite as mesmerizing as chasing videos on YouTube, but I’ve found that there’s a whole world of stuff out there, some of which I only learn about because I’m in the right place at the right time. To that end, I have a few suggestions to share with you that (hopefully) will remove some of the happenstance of discovering something you might not otherwise have encountered. So here I present to you, if you will, a fall reading list.

To ease into things, first up is an article from the September 2017 issue of Occupational Health & Safety entitled “The Right Amount of Leadership Done Easy” by Robert Pater. The opening premise asks the question of how many folks have adopted a strategy because it was easy, even though it was ineffective. I liken this to the “all purpose” response to deficiencies in the environment that focuses on more education of staff, when the response should really by aimed towards why the current education process is not as effective as it needs to be, based on results. My philosophy on this is that (unless you have a woefully inadequate education process) staff have received as much education as they need to. You may need to tweak subject matter over time as risks and conditions change. At any rate, I found the article to raise some interesting / thought-provoking concerns and I think definitely worth checking out.

I just finished reading “Shooting Ghosts: A U.S. Marine, a Combat Photographer, and Their Journey Back from War” by Thomas J Brennan USMC (Ret) and Finbarr O’Reilly. I’ve heard both of the authors interviewed recently (yes, on NPR) and found their account of recent events in various war/strife zones compelling enough to take on the book. Now, you may well ask, what does this have to do with healthcare? And I can tell you there is a lot to do with healthcare—from Mr. Brennan’s travails with the management of behavioral health patients (Mr. Brennan suffered a traumatic brain injury during a deployment in Afghanistan and has been dealing with the consequences of that event) in the VA and civilian systems to some insight to how healthcare can more effectively manage care and treatment of folks by learning more about the “patient experience” (definitely a buzzword in healthcare). At any rate, Mr. Brennan and Mr. O’Reilly’s stories are harrowing, both from an experiential standpoint, but also on (and this is my “take”) the uncertainty of the treatment process—even when practitioners act with certainty.

Next up, we have the Managing Millenials for Dummies Cheat Sheet; a little while back, we covered some the more operational aspects of the impact of millennials in our workplaces (and believe me, they’re not going away), from their view of the world to the more tribal aspects of their attire and personal presentation. I think those of us older (I’m more than half way to my next colonoscopy, so I can no longer consider myself among the young ‘uns) folks can say with some degree of accuracy that things have changed a bit over the last 10-15 minutes (OK, maybe even years, but sometimes it’s overwhelming to look that far back into the past) and I think you’ll find the Cheat Sheet both amusing and perhaps somewhat illuminating. It would be nice if all these generational “buckets” were more easy to profile, but it might beg some questions with/for folks you have working for you. Just sayin…

These last two titles I have not yet read (they’re in my pile), but heard mention of them on the radio (unfortunately, I cannot recall exactly which program might have been the one that planted the seeds of interest). The first, “Games People Play: The Basic Handbook of Transactional Analysis” by Dr. Eric Berne (originally published in 1964—thankfully I was born at that point) rang some bells with me, particularly an example of how certain individuals collect slights against them to be used in the future when they have slighted someone else. The example that sprang to mind was a department director to whom I had to speak about a recalcitrant employee (I think it was a parking issue), with the director responding that “well, a couple of months ago, we found a member of your staff asleep in an exam room,” with the intent that my sleeping staff person was far worse than whatever parking issue was at hand. Of course, I did ask as to why I hadn’t been notified at the time, but the response was somewhat vague and not particularly helpful. I guess it’s kind of like saving things for a “rainy day,” but I am a firm believer in taking care of things now if there is an issue. At any rate, I think it’s kind of interesting to see the various scenarios laid out in a scholarly fashion. I think you’ll find more than a little of the information to represent familiar interactions with folks.

The last title for our little book club is of a little more recent vintage; “Mistakes Were Made (but not by me)” would be interesting if only for the title alone, but the subtitle “Why We Justify Foolish Beliefs, Bad Decisions, and Hurtful Acts” is probably a little more timely than at any other time in recent history. That said, as we in healthcare move ever closer to the vision of just culture (and all the accompanying acts of finger-pointing along the way), I think this is worth a read.

If any of you folks out there check any of these out, please feel free to provide feedback as to whether or not I should stay away from book recommendations.

Stay Calm and Read A Good Book!