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Possibly making the impossible, possible…

As I look back over the years, particularly my time as a consultant, I continue to be fascinated by requests to safety/facility professionals to (channeling Jean-Luc Picard) “make it so,” even when the “so” they are requesting was not considered in the design of whatever system/process that is the target of the request. Just last week, I fielded a question from a facility manager who had been requested to make an OR procedure room negative for procedures on COVID patients. Unfortunately, it wasn’t a direct reach-out so I wasn’t able to dialogue with this individual, so I’m not sure of the particulars (availability of negative pressure procedure rooms in the facility, etc.), but it did get me to thinking about how many impossible things have been done over the last eight to 10 weeks in hospitals all over the country.

As of this writing, the first week in June is bringing about my first onsite client visit since mid-March and I am keen to see what’s been happening “in the field.” Fortunately, through the 1135 waiver process, there have been some instances in which we’ve been able to “bend” the regulatory statutes to some degree, but I think (hope?) we can all agree that there have been (and likely will continue to be) gray areas that are not (at least currently) covered by a waiver and may be so funky in the execution that you could never do more than ask forgiveness when this is all done (recognizing that directly targeted permission has not been abundant). My consultative advice is to keep track of some of the more ingenious (and you can read that as “a little crazy”) solutions to challenges you’ve experienced at your facility—the worst thing that could happen would be for all this stuff to get lost in the slipstream of “getting back to normal” and never get shared with the world at large.

I suspect you are all way too busy to be thinking about this now, but (as an amateur student of history) a response to an unprecedented event would make for an interesting and compelling story for future generations. I hope that we’re not bound for a repeat any time soon, but there are lessons (or, dare I say, teachable moments) for all of us. And with the slow decline of the oral storytelling medium, I want to make a case for capturing this…

Until next time, please stay well and safe—and keep rocking it!

In the grand scheme of things, this helps—but how much?

A few weeks back we chatted about efforts to engage the 1135 Waiver process as a function of fire and life safety systems inspection, testing & maintenance, particularly as a function of ASHE’s efforts to facilitate a coordinated response. Apparently, this part of the waiver picture was not a priority for the folks at regional CMS, so there were a number of rejection notices sent to folks.

I’m not exactly sure what may have transpired (other than the passing of time, but if there were folks with access to CMS ears that continued to advocate, a debt of gratitude is owed), but some items related to certain inspection, testing & maintenance activities have finally made it to the slate of blanket waivers. You can find the information here, on page 23 of the linked document. Unfortunately, it appears that the blanket waiver announcement is being released in cumulative form, so you have to dig a little bit to find the applicable passage. Because of that, I’ve copied and pasted the information below.

As near as I can tell, the areas of greatest concern for the moment are those activities for which waivers were not granted:

  • Sprinkler system monthly electric motor-driven and weekly diesel engine-driven fire pump testing.
  • Portable fire extinguisher monthly inspection.
  • Elevators with firefighters’ emergency operations monthly testing.
  • Emergency generator 30 continuous minute monthly testing and associated transfer switch monthly testing.
  • Means of egress daily inspection in areas that have undergone construction, repair, alterations, or additions to ensure its ability to be used instantly in case of emergency.

In looking at the list, I think that it is both reasonable and very practical from a safety perspective. Clearly, as busy as it is, there are critical processes/protections that need to be assured, so hopefully you haven’t missed any of those noted activities and, if you have, you probably need to start working on preparing your organizational leaders for some likely survey findings.

As a closing thought, lately while walking I’ve been checking out some new (to me) podcasts, one humor-based (Conan O’Brien Needs A Friend—generally pretty good—a couple of good “laughs out loud” per episode) and one not so much so, which is my shareable moment for you. Lately, the Freakonomics Radio podcast has been covering subjects relating to the pandemic, with the episode I listened to today being “How Do You Reopen A Country?” One of my favorite aspects of this program is their tendency to come at topics in a calm, measured fashion, but generally from a somewhat unusual angle, but I don’t want to spoil it for you be jabbering too much. If you’re interested in something thoughtful, but not crazily scary, you might enjoy the episode.

Hope this finds you safe and well – until next time…

CMS Blanket Waiver Information

Inspection, Testing & Maintenance (ITM) under the Physical Environment Conditions of Participation: CMS is waiving certain physical environment requirements for Hospitals, CAHs, inpatient hospice, ICF/IIDs, and SNFs/NFs to reduce disruption of patient care and potential exposure/transmission of COVID-19. The physical environment regulations require that facilities and equipment be maintained to ensure an acceptable level of safety and quality.

CMS will permit facilities to adjust scheduled inspection, testing and maintenance (ITM) frequencies and activities for facility and medical equipment.

  • Specific Physical Environment Waiver Information:

o 42 CFR §482.41(d) for hospitals, §485.623(b) for CAH, §418.110(c)(2)(iv) for inpatient hospice, §483.470(j) for ICF/IID; and §483.90 for SNFs/NFs all require these facilities and their equipment to be maintained to ensure an acceptable level of safety and quality. CMS is temporarily modifying these requirements to the extent necessary to permit these facilities to adjust scheduled inspection, testing and maintenance (ITM) frequencies and activities for facility and medical equipment.

o 42 CFR §482.41(b)(1)(i) and (c) for hospitals, §485.623(c)(1)(i) and (d) for CAHs, §482.41(d)(1)(i) and (e) for inpatient hospices, §483.470(j)(1)(i) and (5)(v) for ICF/IIDs, and §483.90(a)(1)(i) and (b) for SNFs/NFs require these facilities to be in compliance with the Life Safety Code (LSC) and Health Care Facilities Code (HCFC). CMS is temporarily modifying these provisions to the extent necessary to permit these facilities to adjust scheduled ITM frequencies and activities required by the LSC and HCFC. The following LSC and HCFC ITM are considered critical are not included in this waiver:

  • Sprinkler system monthly electric motor-driven and weekly diesel engine-driven fire pump testing.
  • Portable fire extinguisher monthly inspection.
  • Elevators with firefighters’ emergency operations monthly testing.
  • Emergency generator 30 continuous minute monthly testing and associated transfer switch monthly testing.
  • Means of egress daily inspection in areas that have undergone construction, repair, alterations or additions to ensure its ability to be used instantly in case of emergency.

o 42 CFR §482.41(b)(9) for hospitals, §485.623(c)(7) for CAHs, §418.110(d)(6) for inpatient hospices, §483.470(e)(1)(i) for ICF/IIDs, and §483.90(a)(7) for SNFs/NFs require these facilities to have an outside window or outside door in every sleeping room. CMS will permit a waiver of these outside window and outside door requirements to permit these providers to utilize facility and non-facility space that is not normally used for patient care to be utilized for temporary patient care or quarantine.

Feeling pretty psyched: Some good news to share!

In full recognition that the longer the COVID-19 condition persists, the crazier it gets to folks on the front lines, so my intent is to (try—we’ll see how this works out—you know me) limit editorializing and provide you with brief episodes of useful content.

This week, it gladdens my heart to let you know that the good folks at the American Society for Health Care Engineering (ASHE) published a template (and guidance information) to facilitate facilities and safety professionals’ requests for an 1135 Waiver relating to the potential for compliance gaps relative to inspection, testing, and maintenance of fire safety and other equipment. You can find the template and table at the ASHE website. It’s a fairly straightforward process and the template (and corresponding table) really simplifies the thought process; I would encourage each and every one of you to check out these materials and get your waiver requests in the queue. To my way of thinking, this will make things a whole lot easier as we deal with survey activities in the aftermath of COVID-19 and, in the short term, allow you to focus on the important things: Supporting patient care at your organization.

Stay safe and stay in touch as you can—you guys rock!