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Ready, Set, ICRA!

One of the more frequently recurring questions/concerns/vulnerabilities in my travels relates to when it is appropriate to do a (and I will use this term collectively) pre-construction risk assessment, inclusive of all the usual suspects: Noise, vibration, system shutdowns, etc. Clearly (and I know you know, because I see you knowing), the pieces of this puzzle that can get you into the most trouble in most rapid fashion are those relating to infection control and interim life safety measures.

My (moderately) tongue-in-cheek response to any questions about “when” you would employ has typically been “always” (I remember the first time the question came up at a conference and my response was the same—and I’m sticking to my guns on this). My general philosophy as it relates to risk assessments is that we always assess for risk and we implement only what is necessary to manage those risks.

At any rate, as your “homework” for this week (and I would very much like to hear how you folks are parsing this), please look over the list below and figure out where you’ve placed the dividing line for your risk assessment process (basically, where you’d do an assessment and where you wouldn’t), particularly as a function of the Chicago requirement to “when planning for demolition, construction, renovation, or general maintenance [my bolding], the hospital conducts a preconstruction risk assessment for air quality requirements, infection control, utility requirements, noise, vibration, and other hazards that affect care, treatment, and services.” I firmly believe that this balancing act is going to be become a key component of survey oversight. (I would be more than happy to be wrong about this, but somehow I think things are moving in this direction.)

So please look over these perky little definitions and let me know your thoughts:

43.2.2.1 Categories of Rehabilitation Work. The nature and extent of rehabilitation work undertaken in an existing building.

43.2.2.1.1 Repair. The patching, restoration, or painting of materials, elements, equipment, or fixtures for the purpose of maintaining such materials, elements, equipment, or fixtures in good or sound condition.

43.2.2.1.2 Renovation. The replacement in kind, strengthening, or upgrading of building elements, materials, equipment, or fixtures, that does not result in a reconfiguration of the building spaces within.

43.2.2.1.3 Modification. The reconfiguration of any space; the addition, relocation, or elimination of any door or window; the addition or elimination of load-bearing elements; the reconfiguration or extension of any system; or the installation of any additional equipment.

43.2.2.1.4* Reconstruction. The reconfiguration of a space that affects an exit or a corridor shared by more than one occupant space; or the reconfiguration of a space such that the rehabilitation work area is not permitted to be occupied because existing means of egress and fire protection systems, or their equivalent, are not in place or continuously maintained.

43.2.2.1.5 Change of Use. A change in the purpose or level of activity within a structure that involves a change in application of the requirements of the Code.

43.2.2.1.6 Change of Occupancy Classification. The change in the occupancy classification of a structure or portion of a structure.

43.2.2.1.7 Addition. An increase in the building area, aggregate floor area, building height, or number of stories of a structure.

Dance on a volcano: Keeping tabs on those that keep tabs on us…

As we’ve discussed in the past, the world in which we exist—and the stories and challenges contained therein—is never ending. And the subtext of that constancy revolves around our efforts to stay (as it were) one step ahead of the sheriff.

Part of me is railing against my chosen topic this week because I always feel like this space can (and, admittedly, does) have a tendency towards a Joint Commission-centric vision of the compliance universe, but while they may not be the largest primate in the compliance universe (once again violating all manner of metaphoric-mixing indignities), they are (more or less) the organization with the most robust customer-forward presence, through Perspectives to the FAQ pages to the topic-specific offerings we’re covering this week. All things being equal (which, of course, they never really are), I would encourage you to poke around a bit on these sites as there is a mix of stuff that is almost ancient, but some tools, etc. that you might find useful in demonstrating compliance.

The Physical Environment portal is kind of the granddaddy of this whole construct; it started out as a collaboration with the American Society for Health Care Engineering (and may very well continue to be so, but it’s kind of tough to tell) with the goal of providing information on the most frequently cited standards. Unfortunately (for me, but not so much for you), a lot of the information, including “surveyor insights,” is accessible only through your organization’s TJC extranet portal, but there is some stuff that’s worth a look. For example, there is a fire drill matrix that gives a sense of what areas should be considered for your high-risk fire drills (or would it be fire drills in high-risk areas…); the one on the matrix I found of some interest was Cath/EP lab making the high-risk list. I guess the overarching thought is to make sure you carefully consider those areas in which surgical fires a present as a risk.

There are also portals for emergency management, healthcare-acquired infections (I would keep a close eye on that one; lots of indication that this is the next “big thing” for survey), and workplace violence. Keep an eye on them: You never know what might pop up!

Who remembers pop-o-matic Trouble?

In something of a variation on another bloggy evergreen, I ask the rhetorical question: To what, if any, extent have you included consideration of  board games in your physical environment risk assessments for behavioral health? As I think towards a generation (are they already here?) for which the glories of board games will be forever lost, our friends in Chicago offer the latest challenge in managing risks with our all-too-vulnerable patient populations (for those of you of a certain vintage, the description of a board game is very nearly worth the price of admission).

The article describes the quite inventive use of a plastic board game piece to defeat the reptilian tamper-resistant screws and suggest some alternative products that do not so easily surrender to such efforts. I don’t know that I’ve been privy to a lot of discussion relative to board games in the behavioral health setting, but I suppose this would come under the heading of “everything has an inherent, though perhaps not apparent, risk.” Based on some recent surveys, it seems that Joint Commission surveyors have been rather inventive in looking for physical environment elements that have not been specifically accounted for in the assessment process. The classic example is including medical beds in the risk assessment, but not specifically mentioning the risks associated with the ligature-resistance (or not) of the side rails, bed frame, etc. Sooooooo, if they have not yet been included in your risk assessment activities, it might be a good time to pull a little group together and ponder the use of board games (and perhaps other such items) as a function of the behavioral health physical environment risk assessment.

Should we think about Halloween candy as well?!?

Check and mate!

If you don’t signal, how will I know where you want to go? Emergency management and its discontents (Just What You Needed)!

Kind of a mixed bag this week, though it all fits under the heading of emergency management, so here goes nothing…

A few weeks ago, USA Today did a story on the preparedness levels of the United States based on an analysis of state-by-state metrics. The story was based on a study, the National Health Security Preparedness Index, prepared by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and covers a lot of ground relative to trends in preparedness, including governmental spending on preparedness and some other stuff. The reason I “noticed” this was the indication that my home state was “best prepared” for disasters, etc., but the overarching message was that, even in the face of some setbacks in individual regions, the nation continues to improve emergency preparedness. Of course, it being USA Today, there are color slides indicating where each state ranks among the fabulous 50, so if you thought there was no scorekeeping on this front…

OK, maybe not keeping score, but a certain accreditation agency is keeping an eye on all things relating to preparedness. In this blog post, Jim Kendig (field director for the Life Safety Code® surveyors at The Joint Commission, and a very knowledgeable fellow when it comes to this stuff) provides a really good overview of the Preparedness Index and describes it in terms of how the various pieces can (and do) fit together and provide the foundation for an effective emergency management program. I see no reason why we can’t expect something more of a deep dive in the coming survey cycle and I think you’ll find the information Jim shares to be really helpful.

As a final thought for this week, it is always the case that what constitutes a mass casualty incident varies from organization to organization, but if you want to catch a glimpse of how this gets framed within the context of one of the largest metropolitan areas on the planet, the Greater New York Hospital Association developed a Mass Casualty Incident Response Toolkit that you might find worth checking out. There’s a ton of information, tools/forms, and links to more tools/forms, etc., to review in this space, but I encourage you to give the materials a look-see. It does appear that the nature of what we can expect to show up at our collective front doors is shifting and anything that facilitates better positioning to deal with an emergency is worth our time and energies.

Ground Control to Major Compliance: EOC, baby!

As September brings around the unwinding of summah, it also brings around The Joint Commission’s annual state of compliance sessions in locations across the country, better known as Executive Briefings. And, one of the cornerstone communications resulting from the Briefings is the current state of compliance as a function of which standards have proved to be most problematic from an individual findings standpoint.

Yet again (with one exception, more on that in a moment), EOC/Life Safety standards stand astride the Top 10 list like some mythical colossus (the Colossus of Chicago?), spreading fear in the hearts of all that behold its countenance (OK, maybe not so much fear as a nasty case of reflux…).

You can find the Top 5 most frequently cited standards across the various accreditation programs; you’ll have to check out the September issue of Perspectives for the bigger compliance picture, which I would encourage you to do.

At any rate, what this tells us is that (for the most part) the singular compliance items that are most likely to occur (for example, we’ve already discussed the loaded sprinkler head hiding somewhere in your facility—way back in April) are still the ones they are most likely to find. According to the data, of the 688 hospitals surveyed in the first six months of 2019, 91% of the hospitals surveyed (626 hospitals) were cited for issues with sprinkler/extinguishment equipment—and that, my friends, is a lot of sprinkler loading. I won’t bore you with the details (I think everyone recognizes where the likely imperfections “live” in any organization), but (at least to me) it still looks like the survey process works best as a means of generating findings, no matter how inconsequential they might be in relation to the general safety of any organization. I have no doubt that somewhere in the mix of the Top 10 list, there are safety issues of significance (that goes back to the “no perfect buildings” concept), particularly in older facilities in which mechanical systems, etc. are reaching the end of their service life—I always admired Disney for establishing a replacement schedule that resulted in implementation before they had to. It’s like buying a new car and having the old one still on the road: Are you going to replace the engine, knowing that the floor is going to rust through (and yes, I know that some of you would, but I mean in general)? But if the car dies on the way to the dealer to pick up the new one, you’re not going to do anything but tow it to the junkyard. But we can’t do that with hospitals and it’s usually such a battle to get funding/approval for funding/etc. that you can get “stuck” piecing something together in order to keep caring for your patients. It sure as heck is not an ideal situation, but it can (and does) happen. Maintaining the care environment is a thankless, unforgiving, and relentless pursuit—therein is a lot of satisfaction, but also lots of antacid…

One interesting shift (and I think we’ve been wondering when it would happen) is the appearance of a second infection control (IC) standard, which deals with implementation of an organization’s IC plan. I personally have always counted the IC findings relating to the storage, disinfection, etc. of equipment as being an EOC standard in all but name, but I think we may (finally) be seeing the shift to how appropriately organizations are managing infection risks. According to Perspectives, 64% of the hospitals surveyed in the first six months of 2019 were cited for issues relating to implementation, but not sure how the details are skewing. Certainly, to at least some degree, implementation is “walking the talk,” so it may relate to the effectiveness of rounding, etc. Or, it may relate to practice observed at point-of-care/point-of-service. I think we can agree that nosocomial infections are something to avoid and perhaps this is where that focus begins—but it all happens (or doesn’t) in the environment, so don’t think for an instant that findings in the environment/Life Safety will go gentle into that good night. I think we’re here for the long haul…

Like water for opportunistic organisms: Protecting patients through utility systems

As a wise individual once noted, “water always wins” (at risk of betraying my nerd status, you can find the entire quote here), and it seems like water in its numerous forms is giving facilities professionals a run for their money this year. From mold in an OR in the Northwest to the constant battle (or so it seems) with Legionella prevention, this is as challenging a time as I can recall for facilities. And that doesn’t even take into account the ongoing impact of minor intrusions—leaks, condensation, overflowing toilets—it is an almost endless list of troubles.

My intent was to provide the above as information, with my usual encouragement to leverage point-of-care/point-of-service staff in the early identification of trouble spots, but I’m also thinking that perhaps someone out there in the field has been able to develop an effective plan for the proactive management of water woes. Certainly, I know of folks with fairly predictable “rainy seasons” and then there are those locations in which rain is a constant threat, not to mention the intrusion of humidity by various (and sometimes nefarious) means. So, what do you do that works (recognizing that this is not a one size fits all proposition)? Do you have any useful/effective strategies you can share with the blogosphere? I generally only hear about stuff that doesn’t work, so it would be a treat indeed to tout someone’s intuitive brilliance.

As a final note for this week, those of your laboring under the yoke of TJC accreditation might do well to give the August issue of Perspectives a look (it’s become less of a regularly useful read for me, but every once in a while). In the Consistent Interpretation column/article, there’s a lot of discussion (under the guise of the Infection Control standards) of PPE use/availability/education, etc. Again, the findings are falling under the IC standards from a past survey result standpoint, but I don’t think it’s a stretch for some (or almost any) of these to be applied as Hazardous Materials & Wastes Management findings. Again, not everything applies, but I think if we’ve learned nothing else over the years, it’s the funky application of survey concepts from one are of scrutiny to another. Stranger things have happened…

Try to keep things cool over the second half of the summer!

Update: Defunct Links to/in the FAQ-niverse!

Greetings, fellow travelers!

With special thanks to Claire Rebouche for bringing this to my attention, it appears that the links to the new ligature risk FAQs that appeared in this week’s blog post no longer direct you to the content of the latest information (I swear to you that the links were working Monday), but rather direct you to the FAQ homepage. Now, that wouldn’t be such an awful thing if the latest FAQ (for the record, TJC describes it thusly: “Ligature Risks – Assessing and Mitigating Risk For Suicide and Self-Harm”) were readily discernible, but alas (at least for the moment), this particular FAQ is among the missing.

Rest assured, top people are working on trying to find out what’s going on, and hopefully this is but a temporary circumstance (I figure if we can’t find the information, the surveyors might be having a tough time as well—helps to level the playing field). One other thing to note is that where previously the ligature-related FAQs could be found in the EC section of the FAQ homepage, they’ve all been moved to the NPSG section (and, interestingly enough, increased the number of FAQs dealing with ligatures to just over 20), so you may want to keep an eye on any changes in that section (from a practical standpoint, I understand the shift, but I don’t know that they couldn’t have shown up in both sections as a transition, though perhaps they did—I don’t spend a lot of time monitoring the NPSG section of the FAQ page).

At any rate, what I suspect may be happening is that, in their efforts to “clean up” the FAQ page, it would seem that some of the internal links are no longer working, so I’m hoping that we’re just working through a funky transition period and everything will be up and running soon.

That said, there are a couple of other new items relative to the management of this at-risk patient population that I want to share (while they are still available): this one and this other one, which deal with how the process for managing at-risk patients can result in catastrophic gaps in care. I think they’re pretty straightforward in terms of information, but with everything else going on this week, I would encourage you to check ’em out sooner rather than later.

Déjà vu all over again: A new ligature resistant FAQ!

Using the Hospital FAQ page as the baseline, I reckon we’ve got about a dozen FAQs dealing with ligature resistance with this latest offering. For some reason, the “visual” I get from all of this FAQing is the difference between looking at something from a distance (for example, a celestial body) and seeing that same thing up close and personal. What started out as a sphere of incomprehensibility has become (slowly, ever so slowly, over time) a much more nuanced endeavor—an endeavor that continues to represent survey vulnerabilities for accredited organizations.

One of the interesting things to me is how the narrative has evolved over the last couple of years relative to how hospitals are to deal with all the intricacies of managing ligature risks as a survey vulnerability (which is different than managing the risks to patients, but more on that in a moment). This FAQ reveals some specifics as to what you are required to include in the mitigation strategy for those risks that are not yet removed/resolved/corrected/adjudicated, etc. Now, I don’t know that this is truly ground-breaking stuff, but I think this is cray-cray important because this is what the surveyors are going to be looking for, both in terms of structure, but also as a function of an ongoing process. I’m not going to quote verbatim from the FAQ. I know youse guys are excellent readers and such, so a quick summary:

  • Leaders and staff have to know what risks are currently in the mix and somebody has to be responsible for telling them (and documenting that they were told…)
  • Identification of patients at risk for suicide/self-harm, with appropriate risk-based interventions
  • A process for ongoing assessments and reassessments of organization-defined at-risk behavior
  • Staff education re: management of patient risk and implementation of appropriate interventions
  • Ensuring this whole program/process is integrated into the organization’s quality assurance/performance improvement (QAPI) program (sounds like it might be a good time to include this as a standing agenda item at your QAPI committee meetings)
  • Making sure that any equipment that poses a risk, but is necessary for safe treatment of behavioral health patients (the example given is medical beds with siderails on a geriatric unit), is considered, as a risk, in the patients’ overall suicide/self-harm risk assessments, with appropriate interventions to minimize the identified risks

As I reflect over the seemingly endless amount of survey angst that this topic has wrought over the past couple of years, I keep coming back to the reality that while we can always do better (would we have done as much as quickly without enduring survey bludgeoning?), there is minimal data to support that, while not perfect, hospitals were not doing a good job in managing these at-risk patients. Purely from a risk management perspective, this would be a subject of great interest and concern to any healthcare organization as the burden of managing these patients has shifted over time. I suppose it ultimately gets filed under the “abdication of responsibility” that comes with the disenfranchising of difficult patient demographics and the subsequent “arrival” of those patients in the acute care settings, but it seems to me that (and yes, I recognize that this is part of doing business in healthcare) a little more collaboration during this process (as opposed to pointing fingers and assigning “blame”) might have yielded a better end-product. Hopefully, at some point, we will be given credit for the good work that has been done (and quantified), but I don’t think we are quite there yet.

Don’t Call It A Comeback: The Statement of Conditions breathes again!

Not a whole lot going on in the July 2019 issue of Perspectives, but it appears that a little more consideration will need to be paid to the Statement of Conditions (SOC) and Basic Building Information (BBI) sections of The Joint Commission’s web portal for hospitals and other healthcare organizations. The article in Perspectives indicates that we can expect some changes to the questions asked in the BBI section, though the only specific indication thus far is that the questions relating to square footage of your buildings will be aimed at obtaining greater specificity of information, ostensibly to aid in the planning of survey visits. The impression I always had when it came to the square footage ranges was that they tended to “look” at the upper end of the range information, sometimes “encouraging” additional survey days when they might not necessarily have been warranted. My consultative recommendation to folks was to use the comment section to indicate the precise (or would “exact” be the more appropriate descriptor?) square footage so there would be minimal potential for extra survey days. Should be interesting to see how this all shakes out over the next few months as more “reveals” make themselves known.

In other news, the next edition (2022—can you imagine!?!) of the FGI Guidelines for the Design of Healthcare Facilities is in the development pipeline and the good folks at FGI are looking for comments/suggestions to aid in that development, but the window for doing so is quickly closing. You can check out the skinny here, but please know that the comment, etc., period ends on June 30. So if you have some burning thoughts/suggestions for how we will be managing our future facilities (including renovation activities), now is the time for all good safety professionals to come to the aid of their craft (or something like that…).

To close out this week’s chatter, I would encourage you to (yet again!) check out Tim Richards’ blog regarding medical gas certifications and qualifications. As you’ve no doubt noticed, the ongoing codification of everything has really “leaned” into staff competencies and qualifications, sometimes to the point of really muddying the waters as to what really is required. When it comes to medical gas stuff, I don’t know that you’ll be surprised, but it might be useful information to share with your boss (or your boss’s boss). Check it out here.

Wishing each of you a most festive and safe Independence Day!

One size fits all…or one size fits none

In a world in which the economies of scale don’t always economize, I keep running into situations and/or conditions that result from trying to make something do too much. The classic example (other than those one-size-fits-all bunny suits in ORs across this great land of ours—I always end up looking like late-model Elvis, Vegas edition) is the temperature log that is used for food refrigerators, medication refrigerators, etc. As a general rule of thumb, unless the temperature range for each of the refrigerators being monitored is the same (and never mind trying to mix Fahrenheit and Celsius), then you are just asking for trouble. “Pushing” staff to have to discern between competing “out of range” temperature values requires an almost infinite amount of attention, and while there is, in certain instances, some overlap (food is usually 33-40 degrees F and medication 36-46 degrees F, so 36-40 works for both), it just makes so much more sense to limit confusion to the extent possible. And, to my mind, that means individualized temperature logs. One quick note regarding temperature logs for freezers, if your log doesn’t have a temperature “safe” range clearly indicated, I’ve been seeing a lot of mix-ups regarding those pesky negative numbers. For instance, if you establish a target of -15 degrees or colder, -10 degrees would be considered an -out-of-range value, but in talking with the folks doing the monitoring, they “think” of “10” being less that “15,” kind of missing the whole negative number dynamic. I won’t say that this is happening everywhere, but I have run into it in a couple of instances, so that’s something to keep an eye on.

Turning to the Oddities page, I was cruising through The Joint Commission’s FAQ page (admittedly, looking for blog fodder) and came across something of a puzzle; in the text of the FAQ dealing with the “old” requirement of the building assessment as a function of the Statement of Conditions (the old Part 3, which is no longer available) and has not been since 2007. But if you look at the text of LS.01.01.01, the second performance element indicates that a building assessment is required (at time frames to be determined by each organization) to determine compliance with the Life Safety chapter of the Joint Commission manual. I guess the thing that struck me about this happenstance is that the FAQ would have a good opportunity to indicate that the building assessment has evolved (or mutated—your pick) into its present day purpose  as an exercise in assessing your building for compliance with the LS chapter. Maybe they just haven’t gotten around to updating this FAQ (it is a ways down the FAQ page), and I suppose it is no more than a curiosity.