November 11, 2019 | | Comments 1
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Ready, Set, ICRA!

One of the more frequently recurring questions/concerns/vulnerabilities in my travels relates to when it is appropriate to do a (and I will use this term collectively) pre-construction risk assessment, inclusive of all the usual suspects: Noise, vibration, system shutdowns, etc. Clearly (and I know you know, because I see you knowing), the pieces of this puzzle that can get you into the most trouble in most rapid fashion are those relating to infection control and interim life safety measures.

My (moderately) tongue-in-cheek response to any questions about “when” you would employ has typically been “always” (I remember the first time the question came up at a conference and my response was the same—and I’m sticking to my guns on this). My general philosophy as it relates to risk assessments is that we always assess for risk and we implement only what is necessary to manage those risks.

At any rate, as your “homework” for this week (and I would very much like to hear how you folks are parsing this), please look over the list below and figure out where you’ve placed the dividing line for your risk assessment process (basically, where you’d do an assessment and where you wouldn’t), particularly as a function of the Chicago requirement to “when planning for demolition, construction, renovation, or general maintenance [my bolding], the hospital conducts a preconstruction risk assessment for air quality requirements, infection control, utility requirements, noise, vibration, and other hazards that affect care, treatment, and services.” I firmly believe that this balancing act is going to be become a key component of survey oversight. (I would be more than happy to be wrong about this, but somehow I think things are moving in this direction.)

So please look over these perky little definitions and let me know your thoughts:

43.2.2.1 Categories of Rehabilitation Work. The nature and extent of rehabilitation work undertaken in an existing building.

43.2.2.1.1 Repair. The patching, restoration, or painting of materials, elements, equipment, or fixtures for the purpose of maintaining such materials, elements, equipment, or fixtures in good or sound condition.

43.2.2.1.2 Renovation. The replacement in kind, strengthening, or upgrading of building elements, materials, equipment, or fixtures, that does not result in a reconfiguration of the building spaces within.

43.2.2.1.3 Modification. The reconfiguration of any space; the addition, relocation, or elimination of any door or window; the addition or elimination of load-bearing elements; the reconfiguration or extension of any system; or the installation of any additional equipment.

43.2.2.1.4* Reconstruction. The reconfiguration of a space that affects an exit or a corridor shared by more than one occupant space; or the reconfiguration of a space such that the rehabilitation work area is not permitted to be occupied because existing means of egress and fire protection systems, or their equivalent, are not in place or continuously maintained.

43.2.2.1.5 Change of Use. A change in the purpose or level of activity within a structure that involves a change in application of the requirements of the Code.

43.2.2.1.6 Change of Occupancy Classification. The change in the occupancy classification of a structure or portion of a structure.

43.2.2.1.7 Addition. An increase in the building area, aggregate floor area, building height, or number of stories of a structure.

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Filed Under: The Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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  1. This very issue came up on a recent mock survey. The surveyors suggestion made very good sense to me. Basically, everything that comes through your work order system needs to be addressed, at least by policy. Some things can be addressed by elimination, ie. sitting at the computer and adjusting room temperature does not need an ICRA. Some can have a standing procedure, ie. superficial patch and paint will utilize dust minimizing techniques, HEPA vac the area, and damp wipe down. He said, and I believe, that some diligent work up front can cover 90% of what you do.

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