October 28, 2019 | | Comments 0
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You’ve got to get in to get out: New safety adventures in ambulatory care

Hoping that this is more treat than trick, I had cause (albeit minimal) to reflect on what I see as a reasonably significant increase in EC findings being generated in the ambulatory care world. If we accept (and I certainly do) that one of the primary drivers to the survey process is the generation of findings, then it makes all the sense in the world to start “pushing” the survey process in those environments over which we have less control/influence/oversight. I talked a little bit about tools for the ambulatory setting back in January of this year (continuing our program of a self-referential October), and the good folks at ECRI are offering what they are terming a “deep dive” into safe ambulatory care (if you scroll about 1/3 of the way down the ECRI homepage, you’ll find the link to download the report for the low purchase price of some contact information).

The report breaks things down into four key areas: Diagnostic testing, medication safety, falls, and, safety & security. While I recognize the latter two may be of primary interest to this audience, I would encourage you to check out the information relating to diagnostic testing and medication safety. Everything in healthcare (and pretty much any and everywhere else) “exists” in the physical environment (thinking of concentric circles with the patient at the center and the physical environment being the outermost circle), so the interactions between “disciplines” can generate a lot of opportunities when it comes to the practical application of safety and the environment. Taking that with the (at times infuriating) “grayness” of what is required from a regulatory standpoint, it really prompts a level of vigilance that is unlikely to subside any time soon.

To close things out for this week/month, another resource that you might find of interest is a podcast dealing with all things water treatment; you’ve heard (metaphorically speaking) me speak of Matt Freije and the good work he’s spearheading at hcInfo.com and he appears on an episode of the ScalingUp podcast. I found it pretty interesting, but that may just be me. That said, I think the focus and attentions paid to water management plans during survey activities is going to continue to rise and I can see a future in which funky water values will drive Condition-level survey results. Now is the time to start educating ourselves to what it all means and I think this podcast is a good start for folks. Check it out!

And a happy and safe All Hallows Eve to you all…

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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