August 20, 2019 | | Comments 1
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Would you believe there’s nothing up my sleeve?: Protective measures

Caution: This is not a product endorsement, but rather an observation of a product that might, at times, sound a little endorse-y. I can be persuaded…

While working at a hospital somewhere in the United States, I was apprised of a product being installed that will (hopefully) facilitate securing doors that might not otherwise be secured, in the event of an active shooter or other threat that would require the establishment of a safe barricade. Effectively, the product is a metal wedge-shaped sleeve (hence the product name: Fighting Chance) that slides over the arm of a door closer and prevents the door from being opened.

At first encounter, I thought it was a pretty nifty idea (and still do), but I was curious about how one would be able to consistently operationalize the device from a practical standpoint: How do you make sure that you’ve got someone tall enough to be able to reach up and slide the sleeve over the arm? I’ve seen a lot of doors and door arms in my time and I can tell you (I’m about 5’ 6”) that there are some door arrangements for which I would have a very difficult time being able to reach the arm.

So, the question I have (and I will be happy to share the information) is if you are using this product (or even considering using this product), are you including provisions/consideration to assist the more diminutive members of your organization (maybe some sort of step stool stored in close proximity, perhaps something else—I know you folks are creative as all get out)? Have you drilled the used of these devices and found any other opportunities for improvement? I am a great admirer or simple technology and I do like the simplicity of the design—I’m just curious as to how it will play in the field.

I hope it’s a winner!

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Filed Under: Emergency managementHospital security

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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  1. As with pretty much everything out there, it has its benefits and its limitations. If it’s right there at hand near the right kind of door hardware, (and if you had to do a ligature risk assessment in that area, you won’t have that kind of door hardware) it certainly can work. My concern is that if people get into the mindset that that’s action plan, when the awful day arrives, you waste valuable time looking for it only to discover that its been transported to that elusive black hole along with all the HDMI adaptors and ED wheelchairs, surrounded by thousands of pens, snuggly nestled in a mountain of odd socks.
    A belt will do the same job.

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