December 04, 2018 | | Comments 0
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The coexistence of safety leadership and empathy

Two items this week; one survey-related musing and a suggestion for your holiday season reading list.

Monthly GFCI testing: How are you making that happen? While I believe this came up during a mock survey (albeit by an “official” accreditation organization that starts with the letter “C,” ends with a “Q” and greets you if you look in the mirror…), these things sometimes feed on themselves, so to speak. And, since this is one for which I suspect folks might have some challenges, I figured I’d open this Pandora’s Box just in time for the holiday season.

In this particular mock survey, the facilities folks were asked to produce documentation of the monthly testing of the ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) receptacles, which is required as a function of the manufacturer’s instructions for use. In this particular instance, the response was generally minimal, with some questioning back as to the validity of the question. Of course, a quick web search for the GFCI receptacles in question (manufactured by Hubbell) revealed that, why yes indeedy, the monthly testing is right there in the details (I think this may be a good take on who lives in the details, but I digress). In this particular instance, the hospital wasn’t doing it, hadn’t done a risk assessment—either as a singularity or as a function of including the receptacles in an Alternative Equipment Management (AEM) program. So, I put the question to the studio audience: How many of you folks out there are doing the monthly testing of the GFCI (or are you not)? Have you gone the AEM route for this one? Seems like it would be a good candidate with which to get your feet “wet” relative to the risk assessment process. Somehow, I think this might be the dawn of the latest “gotcha” finding, so maybe a little fair warning is in order.

Moving on to the bookshelf (I still read books—I don’t mind using a tablet for some stuff, but for real “reading,” I still like the tactile sensation of a book), I’m in the middle (well, a little past middle, say ¾) of a book entitled “Forged in Crisis—The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times” by Nancy Koehn. The book contains five stories of historical figures (Ernest Shackleton, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, one less well-known to me—Dietrich Bonhoeffer—and Rachel Carson). So far, and probably because his story was the least familiar to me, the Dietrich Bonhoeffer portion of the book was most interesting. He was a minister in Germany during the period leading up to, and through, World War II. I won’t spoil any of the details but one key element of Herr Bonhoeffer’s leadership that’s identified (among others) is empathy, with the point being “the more volatile the larger environment, the more crucial it is for…others with significant authority to appreciate the experiences of those with less power and fewer options.” For a number of reasons (some personal, some professional) that struck me as a very useful quality to possess when one is trying to manage a large and complex environment, particularly consideration of that less power/fewer options dynamic. At any rate, I’m all in favor of lionizing positive role models, so if you have some reading time over the holidays, you might find this a most compelling read.

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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