August 02, 2018 | | Comments 0
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Odds and Sods: Clearing out the Safety Brain

Once again, I come face-to-face with my depository for blog postings and the like, so we have something of a mixed bag this week, with very little in the way of a common theme…

I’m sure folks saw the news story regarding the dead woman found in a stairwell of a hospital power plant and it got me to thinking about the increasing importance of ensuring that all your unmonitored perimeter points are as secure as they can be. It appears that the woman was able to gain access to the stairwell and was either too confused or otherwise compromised to make her way back out. The hospital has since hardened the perimeter of the power plant, but I think this points out that you really need to encourage folks to be on the lookout (security rounds can really only go so far) for unusual circumstances/ folks in their environments. It may be that there was nothing that could be done to prevent this tragedy, but I think it serves as a reminder that you really can’t be too secure.

As something of a parallel pursuit, HCPro recently re-aired a webinar presented my good friend and colleague Ken Rohde on the topic of occurrence reporting and its impact on operations, including the safety realm. Ken is an awesome presenter with a completely useful take on how safety operations impact, and are impacted, by how we manage occurrence reporting, particularly as a source of data for making improvements. If you have some monies in your budget for education, I really encourage you to check out the On-Demand presentation and let Ken help you improve your safety program.

In other parts of my noggin, I was looking at the crosswalk that TJC provides in the online version of their accreditation manual and was contemplating what is referenced as the applicable CMS requirement that “drives” the documentation requirements under EC.02.03.05 EP #28. In all candor, what prompted me to look was this nagging feeling that there are a lot of other required process documentation elements in other parts of the Environment of Care standards and whether there is a likelihood of those documentation requirements being carried over to things like generator testing, medical gas and vacuum system testing, etc. (for you pop culture enthusiasts, I consulted the magic 8 ball and it says “signs point to yes”; for those of you not yet familiar with the amazing technology that is the Magic 8 Ball, find more here). And when I looked at the TJC/CMS crosswalk, I noted that not only is the Life Safety Code® invoked as a referenced requirement, but also the Emergency Preparedness Condition as a function of the provision of alternate sources of energy for maintaining fire detection, extinguishing, and alarm systems. It may not be an imminent shift, but I think you would do well to consider adopting the documentation format outlined under EC.02.03.05 EP #28—it will help organize compliance and maybe, just maybe, keep you a half-step ahead of the sheriff…

On a closing note, I have (yet another) summer reading recommendation for folks: I think we can all agree that the use of effective communications is one of the most powerful tools that we can bring to our safety practices. As you all know every well (I’ve been inflicting this on you all for many, many…), I do tend towards more florid descriptors (that’s one there; I mean who uses “florid” anymore?), which can make comprehension difficult across a multi-faceted audience if you do not take into consideration the entirety of the audience. At any rate, I recently finished Alan Alda’s latest If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look on My Face?, which deals with the science of communications and provides a lot of thought-provoking suggestions on how we might improve the effectiveness of interpersonal communications at every level of life. For me, the most compelling insight was the notion that is the responsibility of the person doing the communicating to make sure that the audience is comprehending what is being communicated. That prompted me to reflect on any number of conversations I’ve had over the years, more or less revolving around the frustration with an audience that “just doesn’t get it” and the thought that perhaps the audience (in all its parameters) merits more consideration when things don’t work out in the way it was planned. At any rate, I found a lot of interesting perspectives on communications and (it’s a pretty quick read) I think you might find a nugget or two for your own use.

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Filed Under: Hospital safetyThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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