August 27, 2018 | | Comments 0
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Never say never: The ligature risk conversation continues…

I truly was thinking that perhaps I could go a couple more weeks without coming back to the ligature risk topic, but continued percolation in this area dictates otherwise. So here’s one news item and one (all too consultative) recommendation.

If you took a gander at the September issue of Briefings on Accreditation and Quality, you will have noted that the Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) isn’t revising their existing standards in the wake of the recent CMS memorandum indicating that The Joint Commission’s (TJC) focus work on the subject of managing physical environment risks and behavioral health patients is an acceptable starting point (and I am very serious about that descriptor—I don’t see this ending real soon, but more on that in a moment). I’m not sure if HFAP makes as much use of Frequently Asked Questions forums as TJC does (and with that use, the “weight” of standards), so it may be that they will start to pinpoint things (strategies, etc.) outside of revising their standards (which prompts the question—at least to me—as to whether TJC will eventually carve out the FAQs into specific elements of performance…only time will tell). At any rate, HFAP had done some updating prior (already approved by CMS) to the recent CMS memorandum, but, in using existing CMS guidance (which tends not to be too specific in terms of how you do things), should be in reasonable shape. You can see a little more detail as to where the applicable HFAP standards “live” by checking out this and this. I would imagine that the other accreditation organizations are looking at/planning on how to go after this stuff in the field and I suspect that everyone is going to get a taste of over-interpretation and all that fun stuff.

In the “dropping of the other shoe” department, recent survey results are pointing towards a more concerted look at the “back end” of this whole process—clear identification of mitigation strategies, education of applicable staff to the risks and mitigation strategies, and building this whole process into ongoing competency evaluation. You really have to look at the proactive risk assessment (and please, please, please make sure that you identify everything in the environment as a risk to be managed; I know it’s a pain in the butt to think so, but there continues to be survey findings relating to items the survey team feels are risks that were not specifically identified in the assessment) as the starting point and build a whole system/program around that assessment, inclusive of initial and ongoing education, ongoing competency evaluation, etc. Once again, I would seem that we are not going to be given credit for doing the math in our (collective) head; you have to be prepared to “show” all your work, because if you don’t, you’ll find yourself with a collection of survey findings in the orange/red sections of the ol’ SAFER matrix—and that is not a good thing at all. We are (likely) not perfect in the management of behavioral health patients and that is clearly the goal/end game of this, but right now anything short of that has to be considered a vulnerability. If you self-identify a risk that you have not yet resolved and you do not specifically indicate the mitigation strategy (in very nearly all circumstances, that’s going to be one-to-one observation), then you are at survey risk. I cannot stress enough that (at least for the now) less is not more, so plan accordingly!

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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