June 05, 2018 | | Comments 0
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With a purposeful grimace and a terrible sound: Even more emergency management!

As much as I keep promising myself that I’ll poke at something more varied, the news of the day keeps turning back in the direction of emergency preparedness, in this case, just a little bit more on the subject of continuity of operations planning (COOP).

Late last week, our friends in Chicago proffered the latest (#41) in their series of Quick Safety (QS) tips, which focuses on elements of preparedness relating to COOPs (nobody here but us chickens). Within the QS tip (small pun intended), our Chicagoan overlords indicate that “continuity of operations planning has emerged as one of the issues that…need to address better in order to be more resilient during and after the occurrence of disasters and emergencies.” The QS also indicates a couple of best practice focus areas for COOPs:

  • Continuity of facilities and communications to support organizational functions.
  • A succession plan that lists who replaces the key leader(s) during an emergency if the leader is not available to carry out his or her duties.
  • A delegation of authority plan that describes the decisions and policies that can be implemented by authorized successors.

Now, I will freely admit that I always thought that this could be accomplished by adopting a scalable incident command structure, with appropriate monitoring of critical functions, inclusive of contact information for folks, etc. And, to be honest, I’m not really sure that having to re-jigger what you already have into something that’s easy for surveyors to discern at the 30,000-foot survey level is going to make each organization better prepared. I do know that folks have been cited for not having COOPs, particularly as a function of succession planning and delegation of authority (again, a properly structured HICS should get you most of the way there). So, I guess my advice for today is to figure out what pieces of your current EOP represent the COOP requirements and highlight them within the document (I really, really, really don’t want you to have to extract that stuff and create a standalone COOP, but if that helps you present the materials, then I guess that’s what you’d have to do…but I really don’t like that we’ve gotten to this point). At any rate, the QS has lots of info, some of it potentially useful, so please check it out here.

As a closing thought: I know folks are working really diligently towards getting an active shooter drill on the books, with varying degrees of progress. As I was perusing various media offerings, I saw an article outlining the potential downsides of active shooter-type drills. While the piece is aimed at the school environment, I think it’s kind of an interesting perspective as it relates to the practical impact of planning and conducting these types of exercises. It’s a pretty quick read and may generate some good discussion in your “house.”

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Filed Under: Emergency managementHospital safetyThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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