March 14, 2018 | | Comments 1
Print This Post
Email This Post

The mystery of the disappearing EP and other tales

I have no way to be certain of the numbers, but I do know of at least one organization that fell victim in 2017 to an Element of Performance (EP) that has since gone “missing.” Once upon a time, EC.02.05.03 (having a reliable emergency electrical source) had an EP (#10, to be precise) that, among other things, required hospital emergency power systems (EPS) to have a remote manual stop station (with an identifying label, natch!) to prevent inadvertent or unintentional operation. (I’m not really sure how a big ol’ stop button that’s labeled would prevent somebody from inadvertently operating the emergency power system; it would surely help if the inadvertent operation happened, but prevention…)

So, to follow this back to the applicable NFPA citation NFPA 110-2010 5.6.5.6, we find “(a)ll installations shall have a remote manual stop station of a type to prevent inadvertent or unintended operation located outside the room housing the prime mover, where so installed, or elsewhere on the premises where the prime mover is located outside the building.” The Explanatory Material goes on to indicate that “(f)or systems located outdoors, the manual shutdown should be located external to the weatherproof enclosure and appropriately identified.” So, that all seems pretty straightforward, don’t you think.

Well, recently (last week) I was working with a hospital that had not bumped into EC.02.05.03, EP 10 and, since I had not yet committed the standard and EP numbers to memory (every time things get changed, I swear to myself that I will not memorize the numbers, but somehow it always ends up happening…), we went to look at the online portal to the standards. And we looked, and looked, and looked some more, and could not find the EP for the remote manual stop. I just figured that I had sufficiently misremembered where this EP, so my plan was to look at survey reports that I know included RFIs for not having the remote manual stops and go from there. So, I looked it up in the survey report, checked the online portal and, guess what? No more EP 10 (in the interest of the complete picture, this EP also requires emergency lighting within 10 seconds at emergency generator locations and a remote annunciator (powered by storage battery) located outside the emergency power system location). Now, from a strict compliance standpoint, as the 2010 edition of NFPA 110 is the applicable code edition based on adoption of the 2012 Life Safety Code® (and I did check the 2013 and 2016 editions, each of which contain the same requirements), I can only guess that the requirements contained in EP 10 are still actionable if your (or anybody else’s) AHJ sees fit to cite a deficiency in this regard, so it’s probably worth keeping a half an eye out for further developments if you have not yet gotten around to installing the lighting, remote stop, and annunciators for your emergency power system equipment locations.

Also, just to alert you to (yet) another offering from ECRI, this past week saw the unveiling of the Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns (download the white paper here). There are a few items on the list that should be of interest to you folks (in bold):

  1. Diagnostic errors
  2. Opioid safety across the continuum of care
  3. Care coordination within a setting
  4. Workarounds
  5. Incorporating health IT into patient safety programs
  6. Management of behavioral health needs in acute care settings
  7. All-hazards emergency preparedness
  8. Device cleaning, disinfection, and sterilization
  9. Patient engagement and health literacy
  10. Leadership engagement in patient safety

I haven’t delved too much into the latest emergency preparedness stuff (ECRI’s take, as well as the Johns Hopkins report), but I’ve queued that up on my reading list for this week, just as soon as I dig out from our most recent wintry spectacular—currently raging outside my window, so I’m going to send this on its way before the power gets too dodgy…

Entry Information

Filed Under: Environment of careThe Joint Commission

Tags:

Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

RSSComments: 1  |  Post a Comment  |  Trackback URL

  1. Greetings, Ep 10 was renumbered and incorported into EP 11.

    The hospital provides emergency power within 10 seconds for the following: Emergency lighting at emergency generator locations. The hospital’s emergency power system (EPS) has a remote manual stop station (with identifying label) to prevent inadvertent or unintentional operation. A remote annunciator (powered by storage battery) is located outside the EPS location.
    Note: For guidance in establishing a reliable emergency power system (that is, an essential electrical distribution system), refer to NFPA 99-2012: 6.4.1.1.6; 6.4.1.1.17; 6.4.2.2; NFPA 110-2010: 5.6.5.6; 7.3.1.

    Regards, Marge

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*