March 19, 2018 | | Comments 0
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The exodus is here: Are you prepared?

Some say not so much.

First off, many thanks to the standards sleuths out there that assisted on solving last week’s missing EP caper; it’s nice to know that I am not merely orating into the void (oration being a somewhat hyperbolic description of this blog—lend me your eyes!).

Now, on to our continuing coverage of emergency management stuff.

The ECRI report outlining the Top 10 Patient Safety Risks for 2018 (if you missed it last week, you can download it here), does make mention of all-hazards emergency preparedness as #7 on the Top 10 list, though I have to say that their description of the challenges, etc., facing hospitals was whatever word is the opposite of hyperbolic (I did a quick search for antonyms of hyperbolic, but nothing really jumped out at me as being apropos for this discussion), pretty much boiling down to the statement that “facilities that were prepared for…disasters fared better than those that were not.” And while there is a certain inescapable logic to that characterization, I somehow expected something a bit weightier.

That said, the ECRI report does at least indicate that there may have been hospitals that were prepared, which is a little more generous than hospital preparedness was described in the report from our friends at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Center for Health Security (you can find the report here). The opening of the Hopkins report goes a little something like this: “Although the healthcare system is undoubtedly better prepared for disasters than it was before the events of 9/11, it is not well prepared for a large-scale or catastrophic disaster.” Now that is a rather damning pronouncement, and it may be justified, but I’m having a bit of a struggle (based on reading the report) with what data was used in making that particular pronouncement. I’m not even arguing with their recommendations—it all makes abundant sense to me from a practical improvement standpoint—and I think it will to you as well. But (I’m using a lot of “buts” today), I’m having a hard time with the whole “is not well prepared” piece (in full recognition that it is healthcare as a single monolithic entity that is not well prepared). Could hospitals be better prepared? Of course! Will hospitals be better prepared? You betcha! Could hospitals have more and better access to a variety of resources (including, and perhaps most importantly, cooperation with local and regional authorities)? Have the draconian machinations of the federal budgeting process limited the extent to which hospitals can become prepared? Pretty sure that’s a yes…

Could the nation (or parts therein) experience catastrophic events that significantly challenge hospitals’ ability to continue to provide care to patients? Yup. Will the nation (or parts therein) experience catastrophic events that significantly challenge hospitals’ ability to continue to provide care to patients? Probably, and perhaps (given only the weather patterns of the last 12 months or so) sooner rather than later. There have always been (and there always will be) opportunities for hospitals to improve their level(s) of preparedness (preparedness is a journey, it is not a destination), including building in resiliency to infrastructure, resources, command leadership, etc. And while I appreciate the thought and preparation that went into the report, I can’t help but think that somehow this is going to be used to bludgeon hospitals on the regulatory front. In preparation for that possibility, you might find it useful to turn your emergency management folks loose on a gap analysis relative to the recommendations in the report (again, I can’t/won’t argue with the recommendations—I like ’em), just in case your next accreditation surveyor tries to push a little in this realm.

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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