October 24, 2017 | | Comments 0
Print This Post
Email This Post

Workplace Violence: One Can Never Have Too Much Info…

I will freely admit that sometimes it takes me a while to get to everything that I want to share with you folks and this is one of those instances…

Back in May (yes, I know—mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa—it was even longer ago that I was an altar boy), ECRI Institute published some information on violence in healthcare facilities that includes a white paper, some guidance on how to share the risk landscape of your facility as it relates to workplace violence and some other information that is accessible upon enrolling in a membership program (they have quite a few different programs, this week’s stuff comes from the Healthcare Risk Control program). I suspect that the provided information may be representative of a loss-leader to drive traffic to their website and service programs (much as this blog is a labor of love and obsession, its function is rather much the same—I don’t know that they would put up with my yammering otherwise), but the information available through the above links are certainly worth checking out (there are also free newsletters; as noted in this week’s headline, information coming directly to you saves having to hunt it down).

Another item on my mental to-do list (and it may very well be that it is on my to-done list, but a little reiteration never hurt anyone) was to encourage you to keep an close eye on The Joint Commission’s standards FAQ page (you have to do a lot of scrolling to get to the Hospitals section—they’ve changed the formatting of this section of their website and it just feels quite clunky to me). At any rate, there are way more FAQs than there used to be (maybe more than there needs to be, but if you make the presumption that the characterization of these questions as being frequently asked, then it is what it is) and you can’t really tell which ones have changed (they do highlight new FAQs; lots of pain management stuff on there right now). They used to include a date so you could more or less keep track of stuff. I’m going to guess that there’s going to be a lot of following up relative to the whole management of ligature risks—and make sure you talk to your organization’s survey coordinator to make sure you access the Suicide Risk Booster (there just seems to be something odd about that as a descriptor). As much as any issue there’s ever been in the physical environment, the management of ligature risks is one for which you cannot be too well prepared (think an infinite number of Boy Scouts and you’ll be moving in the right direction).

 

Entry Information

Filed Under: Hospital safetyHospital securityThe Joint Commission

Tags:

Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant based in Bridgewater, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*