September 12, 2017 | | Comments 0
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Keep calm and stock up on emergency supplies

Hospitals are generally prepared for emergencies, but don’t be afraid to kick those tires one last time.

I don’t know that this last spate is officially the most congested high-intensity weather pattern we’ve ever encountered, but it has got to be right up there in the uppermost tier. As we continue to keep our thoughts on those who have been managing the effects of Harvey, Irma, and Jose, I suppose it’s only a matter of time before the critiques start arriving.

I do believe that hospitals in general are appropriately prepared to respond to emergencies (and I know for certain a number of hospitals that appropriately prepared). As I pen this, I am sitting at the airport in Charlotte, North Carolina, waiting to see if Irma is going to let me get to some client work this week or force me to be Boston-bound.

My philosophy about these things is that there is very little, if any, control that can be exercised as events unfold; the only true aspect of control is to be able to position yourself to make good decisions for the duration of whatever event you might be facing. From what I can gather, this was very much in effect as hospitals in the southeastern U.S. and into the Caribbean responded to recent weather events.

Not every physical plant fared as well as some, but one of the quirky things about catastrophes is they tend to be, well, catastrophic—if it had been business as usual, we probably wouldn’t be talking about it at the moment. At any rate, kudos to those folks who did what they had to do to keep things together, and our best to those for whom every preparation in the world could not have been enough.

In other news

I was going through some stuff I’ve had in the queue for a while that really didn’t fit thematically in the conversation of the week but that I think would be useful to bring to your collective attention. So, in brief (some of you will probably question my definition of brevity, but I can live with that), here they are:

  • For the foreseeable future, there will be a fair amount of scrutiny of the physical environment in your outpatient locations, and a key component of managing those environments is making sure that the folks who are keeping the place clean are on top of their game. It is not uncommon for organizations to have to use independent contract cleaning services for their outpatient locations, but clean is clean is clean—and we know some of the surveyors are not shy about getting out their white gloves and rooting around for GFM (gray fibrous material, a.k.a. dust). Patient environments need to be properly maintained–and you know who’ll suffer the consequences if that’s not happening.
  • Back in April, our friends in Chicago, The Joint Commission, published Quick Safety 32: Crash-cart preparedness; while not everything on their list is specific to the physical environment, there is a lot of fair info relative to process. There are certainly safety and security (not to mention life safety) implications if resuscitation supplies and equipment are not properly maintained—and this applies to your outpatient settings as well. Keep an eye on crash carts wherever they may be.
  • Finally, (and going way, way back to January 2017), The Joint Commission’s Quick Safety 30 covered the all-too-current topic of protecting patients during utility system outages. I think we can all agree that this summer has brought a few too many opportunities to test our mettle in this regard (and, again, great job everyone!), but, as we all know, utility systems can crap out at any time, with minimal warning. So, the watch words (or watch concepts, as it were) are “contingency” and “plans”—redundancies, staff ability to respond to disruptions, etc. are some of the keys to success. Quick Safety 30 also provides a couple of links to some contingency planning resources. The truism underneath all this stuff is that one can never be too prepared, so don’t be afraid to kick those tires one last time.

 

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Filed Under: Emergency managementEnvironment of careThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant based in Bridgewater, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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