August 30, 2017 | | Comments 0
Print This Post
Email This Post

Thoughts and prayers for Houston; plus, thoughts on required ‘policies’

First off, thoughts and prayers going out to the embattled folks in Texas; I do a fair amount of work in Texas, including the Houston area, and while I have absolute confidence in folks’ ability to respond to and recover from catastrophic events, I also know that this is going to be a very tough next little while for that part of the world. Hurricane Harvey will likely fade from the headlines, but the impact will linger past the news cycle, so don’t forget about these folks in the weeks to come. Thanks!

As I was casting about for a subject for this week’s missive, I happened upon a news item in Health Facilities Management This Week (HFMTW) that outlines some of the pending changes to the ambulatory care / office-based surgery medication management standards and the potential further impact of those changes on some of the EC performance elements in those environments. The changes are pretty much focused on emergency power as a function of being able to provide medication dispensing and refrigeration during emergencies.

Now, I have absolutely no issue with making provisions for the safe physical management of medications during power outages, etc.—it is a critical part of the delivery of safe and appropriate care to patients in any setting, and the more we can do to prepare for any outages, etc., the greater the likelihood of continuity of services if something does happen. What really caught my eye in the TJC blog entry cited in HFMTW (you can find the blog here) is something about half-way down the page titled “Emergency Back-Up Policies.”

At the outset of this discussion, I will tell you that, in most instances, I am no big fan of “policies.” In my mind, mostly what a policy represents is an opportunity to get into trouble for not following said policy. So, the question I wrestle with is whether we need to be mandated to have specific policies in order to appropriately manage our facilities, including preparing to respond to emergencies. For example, I am not entirely certain that a policy is going to make the difference in how well hospitals in the Houston area are responding to Hurricane Harvey (at the time of this writing, there are hospitals facing evacuation), though I would be happy to hear otherwise. I just have a hard time believing that having a policy is the answer to life’s problems; I am absolutely fine with requiring hospitals and other healthcare organizations to have a process in place to ensure appropriate management of medications during power outages, etc.—and I’m reasonably confident that those processes already exist in most, if not all, applicable environments.

I don’t know, maybe some folks do need to be told what to do, but I can’t help but think that those folks are fairly limited in number. And the blog even indicates that “there is no specific direction on the content of the policy”, but publishing this blog is going to force the issue during survey. I don’t know, when you look at the Conditions of Participation, etc., there are really very few policies that are required. It seems a bit odd to think that introducing new requirements for policy will somehow address some heretofore unresolved issue (or something). This one just doesn’t feel “right” to me…

Entry Information

Filed Under: AdministrativeCMSEmergency managementHospital safety

Tags:

Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant based in Bridgewater, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*