August 24, 2017 | | Comments 0
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I said you’ll pay for this mischief…

In this world, or the next! Stand by for news…

In this most momentous of years / survey cycles, it appears that there may be at least one more shift in the firmament, that being a transition for a most notable AHJ. The grapevine has been singing this week. (You can reference either the Marvin Gaye or Gladys Knight version; at the moment, I’m leaning toward an invocation of Marvin as it pushes a follow of “What’s Going On”—Brother, Brother, indeed!) There seems to be a changing of the guard afoot in Mordor (or Oak Park, Illinois—take your pick) as it appears that the estimable Director of Engineering for The Joint Commission, George Mills, is transitioning out of the crucible that provides so much in the way of heartburn in the industry.

Word is that one of the engineers in the Standards Interpretation Group (SIG), John Maurer, will be taking the director’s position on an interim basis. Not by any means a comparison (my personal dealings with the departing incumbent have always been reasonable and assistive), but my past interactions with Mr. Maurer have always been thoughtful, helpful and equitable, including indication of how one might plot a course toward satisfactory compliance. In that regard, I don’t anticipate that this will engender a significant change in how business will be conducted, including the practical administration of the Life Safety portion of the accreditation survey process. While details have not yet been officially confirmed, I have no reason to think that the information in general is incorrect, so all I can say is best of luck to everyone as they (and we) embark on their new journeys and pray for a resurgence of benevolence across the board.

To round things out for this week, I would bring your attention to last week’s Joint Commission Quick Safety Issue (QSI #35 in an ongoing series—collect ‘em like baseball cards!) and the topic du jour: minimizing noise and distractions in OR and procedural units.

Now, you’ll get no argument from me that there are certain environments and situations for which noise minimization is desirable, and perhaps, essential. And, empirically, I can’t disagree with any of the characterizations indicated in QSI #35—there are quite a number of footnotes, none of which I have had the time to track down, but, again, I have no reason to think that the scholarship of the article is anything less than spot on. I guess the thought/question/concern I have relates to the practical application of this as an improvement activity (keeping in full mind that sometimes surgeons like to operate to music that ain’t exactly in the realm of quiet—think AC/DC’s “Back in Black” and you’ll be on the right track).

QSI #35 has a whole list of “safety actions to consider,” and the indication is that these are actions that “should” be considered. (But how often have you seen a “should” become very musty during survey…) I wonder if you’ll have the leeway to make the determination of whether you are appropriately managing noise in the procedural environment. I suppose it’s good that this hasn’t shown up in Perspectives

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Filed Under: AdministrativeLife Safety CodeThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant based in Bridgewater, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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