July 31, 2017 | | Comments 0
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Civilization and its discontents

A bit of a hodge-podge this week, with the thematic element of security being the tie that binds, so to speak. There continues to be a lot of news (or it certainly seems that way to me) lately about various security concerns, from violence in the workplace to incursions by unauthorized persons into restricted and/or sensitive areas. We have spent a fair amount of time on these subjects this year (and I somehow suspect that this won’t be the last time for discussion in this realm), but I did want to share some resources with you in case you missed them in the deluge of this, that, and the other thing. (I sometimes marvel that I manage to capture anything, given the fire hose of information constantly spewing into the ether, but I digress.) So, in (relative) brief:

Hospitals & Health Networks (H&HN) published a very interesting story last week about efforts by Milwaukee-based Aurora Health Care to use a clinical approach to reducing assaults in their workplace, including establishment of a Behavioral Emergency Response Team (BERT)—I think you’re going to become very familiar with this term. At any rate, a lot of valuable information, so if you’ve not yet checked it out, I would encourage you to do so (“Violence in the Hospital: Preventing Assaults Using a Clinical Approach“).

In the comment section at the end of the H&HN article, an individual left a comment regarding a public health film titled “One Punch Homicide” that might be of benefit as a preventive measure. I have yet to watch the documentary in its entirety—the trailer is pretty intense—then again, there’s nothing not brutal about violence. The film runs about 90 minutes, but, as information, if nothing else, it’s worth a look: www.onepunchhomicide.com.

As our final thought for this week’s adventure, our friends in Chicago are covering the dangers of tailgating. (I guess since the featured videos are Massachusetts-sourced, the concept of tailgating takes on a whole ‘nutha dimension.) As you will recall, a few months earlier, there was an incident involving an interloper at a hospital in Boston. Since then, the security folks have been hard at work coming up with inventive ways to get folks to use those eyes in the back of their head.

Since it is impossible to determine how much influence anything from Chicago might have on the survey front, I would encourage you (I’m very encouraging this week, aren’t I?) to check out the blog by Dave Corbin, director of security and parking at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, and maybe show these videos to your EOC Committee and maybe others in your organization—this is one of those things that is scary because it’s true (“Leading Hospital Improvement: New Campaign Illustrates Need for Staff Training on Dangers of Tailgating”).

Hope the summer is treating you well—keep it cool and keep it tuned to www.hospitalsafetycenter.com.

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Filed Under: Life Safety CodeThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant based in Bridgewater, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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