April 18, 2017 | | Comments 0
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Domo arigato (for nothing), Mr. Roboto!

In the never-ending pursuit of the effective management of risks associated with healthcare-acquired infections (HAI) comes a new study that begs the question: How clean is your robot? Back in October of last year (don’t know how I missed this one in the news feed…), the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) released the results of a study indicating that the (at least at the moment) complete sanitation of robotic instruments is virtually impossible when compared to “ordinary” instruments. I don’t know that I had given the subject a great deal of consideration, but, at least on the face of it, I can see where there are probably whole lot more nooks and crannies, etc., that could potentially become contaminated during a procedure. The article speaks of greater protein residue and lower cleaning efficacy (a reported 97.6% efficacy rate for the ‘bots, as opposed to the 99.1% for ordinary instruments). It would seem that researchers suggest that it might be necessary to establish new cleaning standards that use repeated measurements of residual protein instead of just taking one measurement after cleaning. The article doesn’t talk about what cleaning methods were observed, so I’m presuming that the typical methodologies were employed, though I’m also thinking that some of the larger portions of the bots end up staying in the procedure rooms, and I’m thinking that when the stuff starts flying, that’s a tough thing to clean. Maybe there’s an application for the use of UV radiation in these types of situations. At any rate, I guess we can file this one under the “you never know what’s going to catch your eye” category, but it may be enough of a subject to prompt a survey question or two about the efficacy of the process.

On the FAQ front, the folks in Chicago have uploaded one that addresses patient-use refrigerators. Not wanting to be a spoiler (or “spoilah” as it is sometimes uttered in Bawston), but if you wanted to guess that there might be an element of risk assessment in the mix, I, for one, would make no move to disabuse you of that notion. I guess the more things get updated, the greater the likelihood that certain themes will manifest themselves over, and over, and over, and over…

In other news, guess we need to think about being a little more careful about what we purchase during those bake sales… I don’t know if you saw the piece last week about a couple of folks at a hospital in NC falling prey to some cannabis-containing baked goods. As events unfolded, the police ended up getting involved, etc., though no charges are to be filed (no drugs in the baker’s possession—I guess everything went into the batter), but I guess it does point out that we’re never too far away from Woodstock. I guess it’s time to update the “don’t take the brown acid” to “don’t take the brownies without a pedigree.” I wonder how this would play on the OSHA 300 log next year?

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Filed Under: CDC/infection controlHospital safety

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant based in Bridgewater, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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