January 06, 2017 | | Comments 0
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My heart is black and my lips are cold

Crash carts on flame with rock and roll!

I figured I’d start out the newly minted 2017 with a few brief items of interest: a device warning from FDA, some thoughts regarding post-Joint Commission survey activities, and a free webinar that some of you might find of interest.

On December 27, the Food & Drug Administration (FDA) communicated a warning letter to healthcare providers regarding potential safety issues with the use of battery-powered mobile medical carts. The warning is based on FDA’s awareness of reports of “explosion, fires, smoking, or overheating of equipment that required hospital evacuations associated with the batteries in these carts.” Apparently, the culprits are those carts powered by high-capacity lithium and/or lead acid batteries and it also appears that there is a distinct possibility that you might just a few of these rolling around in your facility. Fortunately, the warning (you can see the details here) also contains some recommendations for how to manage these risks as a function of the preventive maintenance (PM) process for the battery-powered mobile medical carts; as well as recommendations for what to do in the event a fire occurs (might be a good time to think about testing your organization’s fire response plan as a function of response to a Class C electrical fire). The warning letter also contains some general recommendations for managing the mobile medical carts. So, if you were wondering whether you were going to have anything interesting to put on the next EOC Committee agenda, this one might just fit the bill. As a final thought on this, I think it very likely that our comrades in the regulatory surveying world might be interested in how we are managing the risks associated with these carts—and if you’re thinking risk assessment, I couldn’t agree more!

Moving on to the post-survey activity front, TJC division, for those about to be surveyed (I salute you!), I have some thoughts/advice for preparing yourselves for a slight, but nevertheless potentially dramatic, shift in what you will need to provide in your Evidence of Standards Compliance—a plan for ongoing compliance. Now I will admit that in some instances, being able to plot a course for future compliance makes a lot of sense; for example, managing pressure relationships in procedural areas. If you get tagged for that during a survey, I think it’s more than appropriate for them to want to know how you’re going to keep an eye on things in the future. But what about the million and one little things that could come up during a survey (and with the elimination of the C elements of performance, I think we all know that it’s going to seem like a million and one findings): doors that don’t latch, barrier penetrations, dusty sprinkler heads, etc. There already exist processes to facilitate compliance; are we going to be allowed to continue to use surveillance rounds as the primary compliance tool or is the survey process going to “push” something even more invasive? It is my sincere hope that this is not going to devolve into a situation in which past sins are held in escrow against future survey results—with compounding (and likely confounding) interest. Sometimes things happen, despite the existence/design/etc. of a reasonably effective process. As I’ve said before (probably too many times), there are no perfect buildings, just as there are no perfect plans. Hopefully perfection will not become the expectation of the process…

As a final note for this week, one of the bubbling under topics that I think might gain some traction the new year is the management of water systems and the potential influence of ASHRAE 188: Legionellosis: Risk Management for Building Water Systems. I know we’ve touched on this occasionally in the past and I think I’ve shared with you the information made available by our good friend at the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (check it out, if you haven’t yet done so), but in the interest of providing you with some access to a little more expertise than I’m likely to muster on the topic, there is a free webinar on January 19 that might be worth your time. In the live online event, “Following ASHRAE 188 with Limited Time, Money, and Personnel: Pressure for Building Operators and Health Officials,” respected expert Matt Freije will briefly discuss the pressure facing building operators as well as health officials regarding compliance with ASHRAE 188 to minimize Legionella risk, suggest possible ways to reduce the pressure, and then open the conversation to the audience. The 60-minute webcast begins at 1 p.m. EST. It’s free but space is limited; you can register here.

So that’s the scoop for this week. I hope the new year is treating you well. See you next week!

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Filed Under: Environment of careEnvironmental protectionHospital safetyThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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