November 15, 2016 | | Comments 0
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The song changes and yet remains the same…

There was a time when The Joint Commission actually seemed to be encouraging folks to fully engage with the clarification process in all its bountiful goodness. And I certainly hope that folks have been using that process to ensure that they don’t (or didn’t) have to “fix” processes, etc., that might not have been absolutely perfect in execution, but were not, by any stretch of the imagination, broken. But now, it appears that the bounty is going to be somewhat less bountiful as TJC has announced changes to the process, effective January 1, 2017. Please forgive my conspiracy theorist take on this, but it does seem that the new order in the accreditation world appears to lend itself to survey reports that will be increasing in the number of findings, rather than a reduction—and I am shocked! Okay, perhaps “shocked” is a tad hyperbolic. BTW, in a new Advocacy Alert to members, it appears that ASHE has come to the same conclusion, so it’s not just me…hoorah!

And so, the changes:

 

  • Any required documents that are not available at the time of survey will no longer be eligible for the clarification process (basically, the vendor ate my homework). It is important for everyone to have a very clear understanding of what TJC means by “required documents”—there is a list on your organization’s Joint Commission extranet site. My advice, if you have not already done so, is to immediately coordinate the download of that list with your organization’s survey coordinator (or whoever holds the keys to accessing that information—it may even be you!) and start formulating a process for making sure that those documents are maintained in as current a fashion as possible. And make sure your vendors are very, very clear on how much time they have to provide you with the documentation, as well as letting you know ASAP whether you have any deficiencies/discrepancies to manage—that 60-day correction window can close awfully quickly!
  • While I never really liked to employ this strategy, there were times when you could use clerical errors in the survey document to have things removed from the survey report. Areas that were misidentified on the report (non-existent to your facility; not apropos to the cited finding, for example, identification of a rated door or wall where there is none, etc.) or perhaps the location of the finding was so vague as to be impossible to identify—these have all been used successfully, but (apparently) no more. Now whether this means that there will be more in-depth discussions with the survey team as they prepare the report is unknown at this time, but even if one slips by (and I can tell you, the survey reports in general are much more exact—and exacting—in their description of the deficiencies and their locations), it won’t be enough to remove it from the report (though it could make your ESC submittal a bit more challenging if you can’t tell what it is or where it is).
  • The other piece of this is, with the removal of “C” Elements of Performance, you can no longer go the audit route to demonstrate that you were in substantial compliance at the time of survey. So now, effectively, everything is being measured against “perfection” (son of a…); miss one month’s check on a single fire extinguisher and—boom—finding! One rated door that doesn’t latch? Boom—finding! One sprinkler head with dust or a missing escutcheon? Boom—finding! And, as we touched on last week, it’s not just your primary location (aka, “the hospital”) that’s in play—you have got to be able to account for all those pesky little care sites, even the ones for which you are not specifically providing services. Say, for example, the landlord at one of your off-sites is responsible for doing the fire extinguisher checks; if something is missed (and hey, what’s then likelihood of that happening…), then you are vulnerable for a finding. So, unless you are prepared to be absolutely, positively perfect, you’d best be making sure that your organization’s leadership understands that the new survey reality is not likely to be very pretty.

I would like nothing better than to tell you that with the leadership change in Washington there will be a loosening of the regulatory death grip that is today’s reality, but somehow I don’t think that’s gonna happen…

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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