November 29, 2016 | | Comments 0
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Now bring me some sticky findings—and bring them right here!

Another hodgepodge of stuff this week. I suppose with the holidays, I could be lazy and break these up into smaller chunks of bloggy goodness—maybe next week, but first some ponderings.

I was penning some thoughts relative to the current state of accreditation and a common theme kept reasserting itself: the recent changes are going to absolutely nothing to help decrease the number of findings in the physical environment and, in fact, are much more likely to increase the number (and probably types) of findings experienced during regulatory inspections. Now, I suppose this is rather an extension of the alignment with CMS (I mean, whoever received a visit from those folks and escaped completely unscathed? Perhaps some, but not a whole bunch, I’d venture to guess) and how that philosophy (scorched earth seems like a particularly apropos descriptor—at least at the moment) aligns with the idea/sense/concept that perfection is a noble goal, but not particularly obtainable on this particular space-spinning blue sphere. I’ve said it before, I’ll (no doubt) say it again: they are going to find “stuff” when they visit you—they have to! But that brings me back to the age-old question of what value does this level of attention to minutia bring to the process. I don’t think there’s anyone among us that believes that we have achieved a level of perfection of heretofore untold proportions—has a lot to do with why we have to show up at work every day, n’est-ce pas? There has got to be a better way to facilitate improvement in the management of the healthcare environment without brandishing the regulatory equivalent of a sharp stick (if not a cattle prod). So, as we wind down the 2016 season, those one-off OFIs have now been converted into a cluster of regulatory middle fingers—ouch! Okay, hopping down from the soapbox.

In the December 2016 issue of Perspectives, there is a fair discussion on how the Interim Life Safety Measures (ILSM) process is going to be utilized (perhaps even evaluated) during the survey process. In the October Perspectives, there was coverage of how a completed project (that involved ILSM implementation) would be reviewed to evaluate the effectiveness of the ILSM process. There was also discussion indicating that construction-related deficiencies would not be cited as specific RFIs but rather as a function of the ILSM performance elements. But the December publication offers yet another nuance to the process—when you have a Life Safety Code® deficiency identified during survey, there will be a resultant “discussion” of the deficiency and an inquiry as to which ILSM will be implemented to protect building occupants until such time as the deficiency (or deficiencies) is corrected. I think the important thing to keep in mind here is that the requirement is to implement your ILSM policy, which would then provide criteria for determining what, if any, of the ILSMs would be implemented. I also think that now would be a really good time to dust off your ILSM policy and run it through a couple of test deficiencies to ensure that your policy supports a reasonable approach to ILSM implementation. Finally (on this subject), in the days when clarification of findings was a worthwhile endeavor, it never “paid” to fix stuff during the survey (fixing a condition was tantamount to admitting that you had messed up), but now that everything gets cited, the simplest ILSM to implement is “none at all because we fixed the condition.” Can somebody give me a “that’s a pain in the posterior”? Amen!

As a final thought (or perhaps thoughts) for the week, I think we have to treat any construction or renovation activities as an invasive procedure, so we need to come up a process akin to the Universal Protocol adopted by the folks in surgery to make sure that everyone is on the same page before the activity starts (and that especially includes contractor staff—I am absolutely convinced that we could do a better job with that process).  As an offshoot of this, I think it might be time to adopt a process for periodically evaluating the construction/renovation management process, much as we evaluate the 6+1 EC/EM functions. I can’t think of a single “normal” process that has more potential for disruption, angst, chaos—you name it—than the construction and renovation process. Some folks are fortunate enough to have in-house resources for the management of these activities, but even then there can be opportunities for improvement–the communications process springs to mind as being frequently flawed.

Until next time, I bid you as much holiday cheer as you can tolerate!

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Filed Under: CMSLife Safety CodeThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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