September 27, 2016 | | Comments 1
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Hortle didn’t hear a portal (with apologies to one T. Geisel)

As I get a little longer in the tooth, I find that I need to create reminders for myself of subjects to cover during our weekly visits. Typically, I will capture an idea as a draft email and return to it as time permits. At any rate, as you are very much aware, there’s been a lot of material in recent weeks that have precluded the need to dig into my archives, but in the interest of keeping my draft emails at a manageable level, as well as making sure that I cover all the discussion points that I wanted to share, over the next little bit (unless something breaks big or bad in the compliance world) I’m going to set the wayback machine for stun and run a few timeless classics (at least I think they’re timeless—please feel free to disagree). Let’s hark back to July to revisit a concept that occupies a lot of my waking time: stewardship and accountability for the management of the physical environment.

As I was lurking about Joint Commission’s Physical Environment Portal (PEP) to see if there were any updates to be found, I stumbled upon a missive in TJC’s leadership blog that I did not recall seeing. This dates back to October 2015 in those halcyon days of the early chortlings of the portal… (insert going back in time sound effects here).

In looking at this particular missive (penned by one G. Mills, Director, Department of Engineering—you can find the whole magillah here), there is some ground covered that is among my most favoritest of topics: the universality of the responsibilities when it comes to the management of the physical environment (and for those you who are keeping count, I have no idea how many times I’ve discussed this particular topic, but I’m going to guess it’s well into double digits. And that’s not even counting the number of times I’ve had variations of this conversation with clients). In the blog, Mr. Mills notes that “…the patient care environment is not owned by one group in the healthcare setting.” I couldn’t agree more and yet I still (still, still, still!) encounter organizations that have not fully embraced that concept—which results in very little surprise on my part that eight of the 10 most frequently cited standards are in the physical environment. Mr. Mills goes on to say, “(W)e cannot look to one group to keep the area clean, another to keep the area warm/cool, and then another group to treat patients independently.” But organizations continue to do just that, get bounced around during surveys, and still (still, still, still!) fail to grasp the team concept of managing the environment.

Now it’s certainly not every organization that has these issues, but until every organization gets “down” with this as a way of conducting the business of healthcare, the EC/LS findings will continue to pile up. The silos of clinical and non-clinical functions in healthcare organizations are no longer a tenable model—I’ve said it before and I will (no doubt) say it again—every individual working at every level in every healthcare organization is a caregiver. I’ll give you the direct/indirect split, but taking care of the patient in the bed is the role and responsibility of everyone. It is past time for a new paradigm. Let’s make it happen—even without updates to the PEP!

As a closing thought, I was rather remiss in my discussion of the final CMS emergency preparedness rule. I neglected to indicate that the new regulations are effective 60 days after publication in the Federal Register (which plunks us into November 2016—you can make a reference to turkeys if you like) and implementation must be completed by November 15, 2017 (again, I will stand by my stand that this is not going to be a very big deal for hospitals—I have yet to find anything that is well and truly new and/or different in what is actually required. As with all things, I suspect that the worm will turn on the interpretive dances of the surveyors).

At any rate, if you don’t have plans for next Tuesday at 1:30 pm EDT, you might want to check out the public call to discuss the new rule, hosted by CMS’ Medicare Learning Network. The call is scheduled to last 90 minutes and you can register here. I will be doing client work that day, but I suspect that there might one or two folks from the editorial world that may tune in, so I am looking forward to finding out what the “skinny” might be on all this stuff. Much ado about nothing or something wicked this way comes? I guess we’ll find out soon enough…

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Filed Under: Environmental protectionThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant based in Bridgewater, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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  1. Chortle!

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