May 09, 2016 | | Comments 0
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You better start swimming or you’ll sink like a stone…

In their pursuit of continuing relevance in an ever-changing regulatory landscape, The Joint Commission announced what appears to be a fairly significant change in the survey reporting process. At first blush, it appears that this change is going to make the post-survey process a little simpler, recognizing that simplification of process sometimes ends up not being quite so simple. But as always, I will choose to remain optimistic until proven otherwise.

So the changes in the process as outlined in this week’s missive shake out into three categories: scoring methodology, post-survey follow-up activities, and submission time frames for Evidence of Standards Compliance (ESC). And I have to say that the changes are not only interesting, but appear to represent something of a shift in the framework for administering surveys. Relative to the scoring methodology, it appears that the intent is to do away with the “A” and “C” categories, as well as the designation of whether the performance element is a direct or indirect impact finding. The new process will revolve around a determination of whether a deficient practice or condition is likely to cause harm and, more or less, how frequently the deficient practice or condition is observed. As with so many things in the regulatory realm, this new methodology reduces to a kicky new acronym: SAFER (Survey Analysis For Evaluating Risk) and comes complete with a matrix upon which each deficiency will be placed. You can see the matrix in all its glory through the link above, but it’s basically a 3 x 3 grid with an x-axis of scope (frequency with which the deficiency was observed) and a y-axis of likelihood to result in harm. This new format should make for an interesting looking survey report, to say the least.

Relative to the post-survey follow-up activities, it appears that the section of the survey report (Opportunities for Improvement) that enumerates those single instances of non-compliance for “C” Elements of Performance will “no longer exist” (which makes sense if they are doing away with the “C” Element of Performance concept). While it is not explicitly noted, I’m going to go out on a limb here and guess that this means that the deficiencies formerly known as Opportunities for Improvement will be “reported” as Requirements for Improvement (or whatever RFIs become in the SAFER model), so we may be looking at having to respond to any and all deficiencies that are identified during the course of the survey. To take that thought a wee bit further, I’m thinking that this might also alter the process for clarifying findings post-survey. I don’t imagine for a moment that this is the last missive that TJC will issue on this topic, so I guess we’ll have to wait and see how things unfold.

As far as the ESC submission timeframes, with the departure of the direct and indirect designations for findings comes a “once size fits all” due date of 60 days (I’m glad it was a “45 days fits all” timeframe), so that makes things a little less complicated. But there is a notation that information regarding the sustainment of corrective actions will be required depending on where the findings fall on the matrix, which presumable means that deficiencies clustered in the lower left corner of the matrix (low probability of harm, infrequent occurrence) will drive a simple correction while findings in the upper right corner of the matrix will require a little more forethought and planning in regards to corrective actions.

The rollout timeframe outlined in the article indicates that psychiatric hospitals that use TJC for deemed status accreditation will start seeing the new format beginning June 6 (one month from this writing) and everyone else will start seeing the matrix in their accreditation survey reports starting in January 2017. I’m really curious to see how this is all going to pan out in relation to the survey of the physical environment. Based on past practices, I don’t know that (for the most part) the deficiencies identified in the EC/EM/LS part of the survey process wouldn’t mostly reside in that lower left quadrant, but I suppose this may result in focus on fewer specific elements (say, penetrations) and a more concerted approach to finding those types of deficiencies. But with the adoption of the 2012 Life Safety Code®, I guess this gives us something new to wait for…

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Filed Under: Environment of careLife Safety CodeThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant based in Bridgewater, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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