May 25, 2016 | | Comments 0
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The answer, my friends, is blowing in your facility

As I think everyone is aware, there has been a lot (okay, perhaps quite a lot) of focus during our pas de deux with the regulatory survey groups running around our hospitals on the various and sundry environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, air pressure relationships) for which there are various and sundry requirements (we’ve discussed those general considerations in the past, but if you need a refresher, feel free to dig through the archives at Hospital Safety Center). But a recent issuance from the CDC really starts to point to some of the ways in which the whole air pressure thing can actually influence the effectiveness of the management of immunocompromised patients as a function of air pressure relationships. There’s also an interesting study done by the folks at Johns Hopkins that speaks to the amount of time the doors to surgical procedural rooms are open during cases. I think we can all agree that keeping the doors shut during cases should probably be on the list of good ideas, but I suppose there can be a lot of coming and going—enough to de-pressurize the room. I’ve always felt that it is important to have some sense of how long it takes to de-pressurize and re-pressurize some of these critical areas; you want to make sure that folks are checking the pressure relationships when you have your greatest chance of success, recognizing that these rooms all “breathe” to one extent or another (and some of them come very close to wheezing…).

At any rate, information like this will likely only increase the attention paid to these areas during our survey encounters, with the added dynamic of this information being representative of the time-honored “smoking gun.” So, certainly acting on the CDC’s recommendation that immunocompromised patients not be placed in negative-pressure environments is something we can implement right away, but you’re probably going to want to come up with some sort of methodology for identifying those patients that rule in for that demographic (I’m thinking that our patients would tend more towards the immunocompromised side of the coin than not). We certainly don’t want to inadvertently put patients at elevated risk for infection, etc., by placing them in an inappropriate environment, so I think my immediate advice would be to look really closely at the information from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center cases. If the end result looks an awful lot like a risk assessment, then I think you’re in the right place—and your patients will be, too!

 

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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