May 17, 2016 | | Comments 1
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Everybody here comes from somewhere else…

First off, just wanted to wrap up on the missives coming forth from our compadres at The Joint Commission and ASHE relative to the adoption of the 2012 Life Safety Code® (LSC) by CMS. The word on the street would seem to be rather more positive than not, which is generally a good thing. Check out the statements from TJC and ASHE; also, it is useful to note that the ASHE page includes links to additional materials, including a comparison of the 2000 and 2012 editions of the LSC, so worth checking out.

At this point, it’s tough to say how much fodder there will for future fireside chats. It does appear that the adoption of the 2012, while making things somewhat simpler in terms of the practical designation of sleeping and non-sleeping suites (Don’t you wish they had “bumped” up the allowable square footage of the non-sleeping suites? Wouldn’t that have been nice.), combustible decorations and some of the other areas covered by the previously issued CMS categorical waivers (If you need a refresher, these should do you pretty well: ASHE waiver chart and Joint Commission), isn’t necessarily going to result in a significant change in the numbers and types of findings being generated during Joint Commission surveys. From my careful observation of all the data I can lay hands on, the stuff that they’re finding is still going to be the stuff that they are likely to continue to find as they are the “deficiencies” most likely to occur (going back to the “no perfect buildings” concept—a lovely goal, but pretty much as unattainable as Neverland). I’m not entirely certain what will have to occur to actually bring about a change in EC/LS concerns predominance on the Top 10 list; it’s the stuff I can pretty much always find (and folks usually know when I’m coming, so I’ve pretty much lost the element of surprise on the consulting trail). Now, it may be that the new matrix scoring methodology will reduce the amount of trouble you can get into as the result of existing deficiencies—that’s the piece of this whole thing that interests me the most—but I see no reason to think that those vulnerabilities will somehow eradicate themselves. I suppose there is an analogy relative to the annual review of our hazard vulnerability analysis (HVA)—the vulnerabilities will always exist—what changes (or should change) is our preparedness to appropriately manager those vulnerabilities. Makes me wonder if it would be worth doing an EC/LS HVA kind of thing—perhaps some sage individual has already tackled that—sing out if you have. At any rate, I’ll be keeping a close eye on developments and will share anything I encounter, so please stay tuned.

Hopping over to the bully pulpit for a moment, I just want to rant a bit on what I think should be on the endangered species list—that most uncommon of beasties—the kind and decent person. I know that everyone is nice to folks they know (more or less), but there seems to be a run on a certain indifference to politeness, etc., that, to be honest, makes me see a little read from time to time. But then I think to myself that it is probably just as rude to overreact to someone else’s rudeness, so take some deep cleansing breaths and let it go. Now I would love to hear from folks that they haven’t noticed this shift and that their encounters with folks are graced with tolerance, kindness, etc.; it would do my heart good. Maybe it’s just me…but somehow I’m thinking maybe not.

Please enjoy your week responsibly and we’ll see what mischief we can get into next week.

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Filed Under: Environment of careLife Safety CodeThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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