April 26, 2016 | | Comments 0
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Musings from Rantopolis

There are a couple of developments on the Joint Commission front. They’re deleting some 131 performance elements from across the accreditation manual; a few are EC-related, but none in the EM or LS chapters, I want to take a few moments to look at the tea leaves before I weigh—maybe I’ll include in our upcoming edition of portal chortlings—we’re about due for a fireside chat, but anyways…

This just in: The Clarifications and Expectations column penned by Mr. Mills is “on hiatus,” but scheduled to return in June 2016. Curiouser and curiouser…

Last week I was working with a client on answering a citation that had come up during a TJC survey (not their survey, but someone else’s—sometimes folks will share post-survey intel). The finding was related to the storage of toilet paper and paper towel in a housekeeping closet, based on (presumably) the notion of the housekeeping closet as a “soiled” area and the toilet paper and paper towel being “clean” supplies (remembering that when we use toilet paper, the rolls are right next to the toilet OMG…OMG…OMG!). Now I am reasonably certain that (much like some other conditions and/or practices I will note in a moment) there are no specific regulatory standards that speak to how and where one is to store paper supplies, etc., so, once again, we come up against the assumed role of the surveyor cadre in prescribing practices instead of assessing how well a risk is being managed. Are there housekeeping closets that are somewhat less reputable looking than others? Absolutely! Are there risks associated with storing paper products in housekeeping closets? Absolutely! Are there risks associated with storing paper products in clean utility rooms, including the potential for pests? Absolutely! Is this a discussion that could go on forever? Absolutely!

To paraphrase the late, great Lewis Allen (you probably know him just as “Lou”) Reed, I am sick of it. I am sick of seeing findings like “linen cart cover was not down,” “solid bottom shelf was not in place,” “materials stored under a sink,” “toilet paper and paper towel stored in a housekeeping closets,” “cardboard boxes in clean utility rooms.” The whole concept of the management of the physical environment is supposed to be based on managing the risks is that very same physical environment. Show me how whatever condition being cited is actually resulted in a risk that is being appropriate managed—not merely the possibility of a potentially increased risk if the planets are in the correct alignment, etc., etc., ad nauseum. Every time I think about the “war on cardboard,” I grind my whole being (not just my teeth); yes, there are places where cardboard ought not be broken down (sterile supply areas, etc.) but those locations are very limited. Show me that we’re not managing the cardboard appropriately. Show me real evidence (not online pictures) that we are legitimately dealing with cardboard critter condos. I absolutely, beyond any shadow of doubt, understand and recognize the risk potential of cardboard, but if there’s no evidence that the cardboard boxes are doing anything more than appropriately holding the contents of said boxes, how does that become a citable offence? When I think of the hundreds of thousands of dollars that have been wasted purchasing plastic bins that (channeling T. Swift here) never, ever, ever, ever (is that too many “evers”?)  get cleaned…check ’em out if you don’t believe me. And never mind the kabillion of labor hours devoted to removing all the whatevers from those cardboard boxes and putting them in the plastic bins as opposed to delivering the box full of stuff and then throwing that every same box away when it is empty. In fact, I would submit to you that by getting rid of the cardboard, we have made it exponentially more difficult to manage expiring product. Old days: case with expiration date on it; when case is empty, throw case away—boom! New days: plastic bin almost empty so we dump more product in on top of the old stuff (Oh sure, we’re taking the old stuff out and then placing it in a bag on top of the new stuff to ensure the old stuff gets used first. Yup, that’s what’s happening, yes indeedy…) I’m sure each of you can think of some “practice” that’s being enforced in your organization that is based on not much in the way of logic (logic doesn’t seem to prevail as much as it used to—I can’t think that that’s a good thing). I think we need to take a stand. (“I’m rather unhappy about the current state and I’m not inclined to support it any longer” or the more pointed “I’m mad as hell and I’m not going to take it anymore.” We safety professionals are more inclined towards the genteel first versions when in polite conversation, but deep inside, you know what I’m talkin’ about!)

Okay, that’s probably enough on that topic for the moment (I’m going to guess that there may be one or two heads nodding in the affirmative at this point in my screed, though perhaps there are others that might disagree). If there’s such a strong feeling about this stuff, then the regulators should be very clear about those “clarifications and expectations.” There’s a process for reviewing the survey results before the final results are provided to each organization. Use it to remove these findings that are truly no more than surveyor bias (yeah, it’s like how tough it is to reverse an official decision in sports). Unless, of course, the purpose of the current survey process is to generate as many findings as humanly possible…nah—who’d believe that!

So join us next week as we add another section to our construction of the immortal portal cortile chortle…

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Filed Under: Environment of careHospital safetyThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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