December 30, 2015 | | Comments 0
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IFU? No, you IFU!

As this little screed represents the closing of the 2015 blogging season (I figure there’s gotta be a lumberjack tie-in—blogging and logging are just too close for words), I’m going to try and keep it relatively brief. If brevity is indeed the soul of wit, then I tend to be rather more witless than not…

Another recent trend in survey findings relates to the management of some of your more “peripheral” patient care equipment, particularly the stuff that gets used by the good folks in the rehabilitation/physical therapy world: hydrocollators, paraffin baths, etc. While I do believe that we have things well in hand from a medical equipment standpoint (most of the equipment being cited falls very clearly into the low-risk/no-risk category), where this is skidding a bit sideways is when the devices in question are not being maintained by the end users in accordance with the manufacturer Instructions For Use (IFU). Now, I will freely indicate that some of the equipment we’re talking about is almost Biblically ancient and the IFUs might not be easily obtainable, but in the absence of a risk assessment to indicate that maintaining this stuff in a manner that is not in strict accordance with the IFUs results in an acceptable level of operational performance/reliability/cleanliness, etc. then you’re at risk for yet another of the (seems like) gazillion little imperfections that are gracing survey reports across the continuum. Interestingly enough, these findings do seem to be “clumping” under the Infection Control standards (pretty much IC.02.02.01, EP 4, which deals with the storage of supplies and equipment), so this may not be on everyone’s radar at the moment. That said, it might be a good idea to poke around a little bit—including any offsite rehab/PT locations—to see if you have any survey risk exposure. Once again, I’m not convinced that this represents a significant risk to patients, but my being convinced (or not) doesn’t necessarily keep you out of trouble during survey. We need to be very sure about where we “stand” in relation to what manufacturers are recommending and what practices and conditions provide appropriate levels of safety, cleanliness, etc. The Joint Commission doesn’t tell us how to do these things, but we need to be able to respond definitively when the questions are (and there is a certain inevitability here) raised during survey.

And on that note, I wish each and every one of you a most prosperous, safe, and successful 2016. See you next year!

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Filed Under: Environment of careThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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