November 24, 2015 | | Comments 0
Print This Post
Email This Post

Now be thankful…

While the events of recent weeks seem to focus our attentions on the darker side of humanity, before jumping into this week’s “serious” topic, I did want to take a moment to wish you all a most joyous Thanksgiving. Your continued presence in this community is one of the things for which I am thankful, so I will, in turn, thank each one of you for that presence—without you, there wouldn’t be much purpose to this little rant-o-rama! And a special thanks to Jay Kumar from HCPro, who manages to keep things going!

And so, onto the business at hand. In the aftermath of the Paris terror attacks, the folks at the Department of Homeland Security are encouraging hospitals and other healthcare organizations to review our security plans and to work towards exercising them on a regular basis (you can read the full notice here). The notice contains a whole bunch of useful information, including indicators to assist in identifying suspicious behaviors and to build a truly robust process for reporting suspicious activity. It’s always tough to say how much of an event could have been prevented if folks were more skilled in identifying threats before they are acted upon, but I guess we always have to use such events as a means of improving our own situations. At any rate, I think it would behoove everyone in the audience to take a look at the materials referenced in the notice. A lot of times, I think we find ourselves “casting about” for direction when it comes to the practical application of how we become better prepared, particularly in the healthcare world of competing priorities. I also know that it is sometimes challenging to get folks to seriously participate in exercises—I don’t know that we’ll ever completely get away from having to deal with what I will characterize as moderate indifference. The events in Paris (and Mali) only point out that this is a risk shared by everyone on the planet, whether we would want it or not. And the more we educate folks to recognize threatening situations, the better able they will be to keep themselves safe. I wish there were a simple solution to all this, but in the meantime, the strategy of increased vigilance will have to do.

Entry Information

Filed Under: Emergency managementHospital security

Tags:

Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*