November 16, 2015 | | Comments 0
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May I? Not bloody likely! The secret world of ‘NO EXIT’ signs

There’s been something of a “run” on a particular set of findings and since this particular finding “lives” in LS.02.01.20 (the hospital maintains the integrity of egress), one of the most frequently cited standards so far in 2015 (okay, actually egress findings have been among the most frequently cited standards pretty much since they’ve bene keeping track of such things), it seems like it might not be a bad idea to spend a little time discussing why this might be the case. And of course, I am speaking to that most esoteric of citations, the “NO EXIT” deficiency.

For my money (not that I have a lot to work with), a lot of the “confusion” in this particular realm is due to The Joint Commission adopting some standards language that, while perhaps providing something a little bit more flexible (and I will go no further than saying perhaps on this one, because I really don’t think the TJC language helps clarify anything), in doing so, creates something of a box when it comes to egress (small pun intended). The language used by NFPA (Life Safety Code® 2000 edition 7.10.8.1) reads “any door, passage, or stairway that is neither an exit nor a way of exit access and that is arranged so that it is likely [my italics] to be mistaken for an exit shall be identified by a sign that reads as follows: NO EXIT.” To be honest, I kind of like the “likely” here—more on that in a moment.

Now our friends in Chicago take a somewhat different position on this: Signs reading ‘NO EXIT’ are posted on any door, passage, or stairway that is neither an exit nor an access to an exit but may (my italics, yet again) be mistaken for an exit. (For full text and any exceptions, refer to NFPA 101 – 2000: 7.10.8.1.) If you ask me, there’s a fair distance between something that “may” be mistaken for something else, like an exit and something that is likely to be mistaken for something else, like that very same exit. The way this appears to be manifesting itself is those pesky exterior doors that lead out into courtyard/patio areas that are not, strictly speaking, part of an egress route. Of especially compelling scrutiny are what I will generally describe as “storefront doors”—pretty much a full pane of glass that allows you to see the outside world and I will tell you (from personal experience) that these are really tough findings to clarify post-survey. Very tough, indeed.

So it would behoove you to take a gander around your exterior doors to see if any of those doors are neither an exit nor an access to an exit and MAY be mistaken for an exit. For some of you this may be a LIKELY condition, so you may want to invest in some NO EXIT signs. And please make sure they say just that; on this, the LSC is very specific in terms of the wording, as well as the stroke of the letters: “Such sign shall have the word NO in letters 2 inch (5 cm) high with a stroke width of 3/8 inch (1 cm) and the word EXIT in letters 1 inch (2.5 cm) high, with the word EXIT below the word NO.” This way you won’t be as likely to be cited for this condition as you may have before…

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Filed Under: Life Safety CodeThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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