August 31, 2015 | | Comments 0
Print This Post
Email This Post

Same as it ever was… same as it ever was… same as it ever was…

As the back-to-school sales reach their penultimate conclusion, I look back on the year so far and am amazed at how quickly we’ve blown through fully two-thirds of 2015—yow! For a while it seemed like winter was never going to release us from its icy grasp and now we’re looking forward to its return, so I guess we have naught to do but look forward towards the onslaught of 2016. I hope, for all our sakes, it is a kinder and gentler new year.

But before the past little while takes on the rosy hue of nostalgia (as it almost always does), our friends in Chicago have provided an excellent opportunity to reflect on the “sins” of the past by revealing the most frequently cited standards during the first six months of 2015. And to almost no one’s surprise, four out of the top five most frequently cited standards (at the moment, the “reveal” is only for the top five—I guess we’ll find out about the rest of the top 10 at some point) are smack dab in the middle of the management of the physical environment, with the top three most frequently cited standards for hospitals being EC.02.06.01 (#1 with 59% of hospitals surveyed being cited), IC.02.02.01 (#2 and 54%) and EC.02.05.01 (#3 and 53%; looks like a real fight for that #2 spot), all of which reflect elements tying together the management of the physical environment with the control and prevention of infection (not everything cited is in the physical environment/infection control bucket, but from what I can gather, rather a fair amount is related to just that).

At this point (and I full recognize that this is a rather reiterative statement), I’m going to crawl out on a limb and say that the single greatest survey vulnerability for any (and every) healthcare organization is the management of the surgical/procedural/support environments. The hegemony of this aspect of the survey (and regulatory compliance) process comes very close to defying understanding. At this point, there’s no real surprise that this is an (if not the, and I would argue “the” is the word) area of intense survey scrutiny, so what’s the deal?!? Forty percent of the hospitals surveyed from January to June appear to have done okay on this, or is that number really a red herring? It would not surprise me that 100% of the hospitals surveyed ran afoul of one of the top three. Anybody out there surveyed so far this year that managed to escape, relatively, scott-free on this?

I’ve certainly done a lot of yammering in this regard over the past few months (years?) and it appears that I am raging against the dying of the light to minimal effect. I have a lot of ideas about this, but I guess I’m putting it out there: has anybody really got this under control? I think we all have a stake in this thing and the sooner we can get our hands on an effective process for managing this, the better. I will admit that it is entirely possible that, particularly given the age of a lot of hospital infrastructure components, this is not going to go away until they stop focusing as much on it. At this point, I haven’t run into too many folks that have been cited under the big three for whom infection rates are anything other than what would normally be expected—though perhaps infection control rates are higher than they “should/can” be—I guess we could be in the midst of a paradigm shift on this. I don’t want to have to wait to find out.

Letting the days go by…

Entry Information

Filed Under: Environment of careLife Safety CodeThe Joint Commission

Tags:

Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant based in Bridgewater, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*