August 03, 2015 | | Comments 0
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Leave it better than you found it!

This past week (and this coming week as well), I’ve been on vacation in Maine (code name: A Beautiful Place by the Sea), which affords me the luxury of observing a lot of human behaviors, some interesting, some not so much. Some winning, and others that just grate.

There’s been a movement to reduce the amount of “invasive” plant species that have, in some instances, overtaken the natural landscape (and no, I’m pretty sure that this reduction is going to extend to tourists, though I bet there are moments…). So something of a reclamation project is underway, the result of which will (ideally) be a sustainable and less intrusive beautification. Where things go a little awry is in the areas somewhat off the more deliberately beauteous locales and offers what appears to be too many opportunities for the dark underside of human behavior to hold sway. Each morning, I make a circuit of the area and have noted beer and soda cans tossed into bushes, dirty diapers tossed under those same bushes and all matter of detritus left behind, presumably because the effort to properly dispose of these items was greater than what could be tolerated in the moment. My walk, at least partially, includes collecting some trash (I will admit that I’ve avoided the dirty diapers—I will have to prepare better in the future) along the way, but I have a pretty good sense of where the waste receptacles are along the way, so it’s not like I have to lug the stuff for miles.

At this point, you’re probably asking yourself: What does this have to do with healthcare safety and the myriad related conditions and practices that I might encounter during the workday? Well, the thought that keeps returning to the front of my head goes back to the age-old task of trying to “capture” these conditions at the point at which they occur, or at least when they are identified (yes, it’s another “see something, say something” tale). When we encounter unsafe conditions during rounds—damaged walls, unattended spills, etc.—we “know” that these things did not happen by themselves, so what prevented the originator of the condition from at least saying, “Oh poop, I need to tell somebody about that hole in the wall/spill on the floor so it can be remedied.” Not a particularly difficult thing conceptually, but human behavior-wise, it seems like it is an impossible task. I suppose you could look at it as job security (hahaha!), but having to manage all these little “dings” keeps us away from paying attention to the big and bigger dings that we know are out there. I suspect that I’m probably not supposed to be thinking about this stuff so much when on vacation, but I guess that’s part of my brain that never really shuts off. And don’t get me started about people who leave shopping carts out in the middle of the parking lot at the grocery store (yes, that’s me pushing a line of carts either to the cart corral or back to the store—it is a most consistent manifestation of my OCD). Hope your August is proving to be most splendid!

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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