- Mac's Safety Space - http://blogs.hcpro.com/hospitalsafety -

I don’t think you’re spending enough time in the restroom…

In preparation for our journey into the restrooms of your mind (sorry—organization), you might consider a couple of things. Practicing this during surveillance rounds is probably a good thing; increasing folks’ familiarity with the potential expectations of the process is a good thing. But in practicing, you can also consider identifying an organizational standard for responding to restroom call signals, that way you can build at least a little flexibility into the process, maybe enough to push back a little during survey if you can allow for some variability.

Another restroom-related finding has had to do with the restrooms in waiting areas in clinic settings (ostensible restrooms that can be used by either patients or non-patient who may be in the waiting area). There is a requirement for a nurse call to be installed in patient restrooms, but there is no requirement for a nurse call to be installed in a public restroom. So what are these restrooms in waiting areas? I would submit to you that, in general, restrooms in waiting areas ought to be considered public restrooms and thus not required to have nurse calls. Are there potential exceptions to this? Of course there are—and that’s where the risk assessment comes into play. Perhaps you have a clinic setting in which the patient population being served is sufficiently at risk to warrant some extra protections. Look at whether there were any instances of unattended patients getting into distress, etc. (attended versus unattended is a very interesting parameter for looking at this stuff). Also, look at what the patients are being seen for; maybe cardiac patients are at a sufficiently high enough risk point to warrant a little extra.

At the end of the process, you should have a very good sense of what you need to have from a risk perspective. That way if you have a surveyor who cites you for not having a nurse call in a waiting area restroom, you can point to the risk assessment process (and ongoing monitoring of occurrences, etc.) as evidence that you are appropriately managing the associated risks—even without the nurse call. In the absence of specifically indicated requirements, our responsibility is to appropriately manage the identified/applicable risks—and how we do that is an organizational decision. The risk assessment process allows us the means of making those decisions defensible.