September 30, 2014 | | Comments 0
Print This Post
Email This Post

Sometimes miracles really do happen…BREAKING NEWS!

In what is clearly one of the busiest years for regulatory upheaval in the healthcare safety world (at least in recent memory), CMS has, yet again, turned things on their ear—and to what all appearances seems to be a most positive potential outcome—in its ongoing series of categorical waivers. And this on a topic that has caused a ton of gnashed teeth and much sorrowful wailing: the use of relocatable power taps.

You will recall (it seems no more than minutes ago) that back in June (2014), George Mills, director of The Joint Commission’s Department of Engineering, was tasked with the dubious honor of announcing to the world that, basically, the use of relocatable power taps to power medical equipment in patient care areas was on the no-no list. Since then, many (okay, probably just about everyone to one degree or another) facilities and safety folks have been spending countless hours trying to figure out how to make this happen. So I guess this means that CMS has decided that Mr. Mills doesn’t have to get painted with the “bad guy” brush any longer as they have issued a categorical waiver that provides a fair amount of flexibility for the presence of RPTs in the patient care environment.

Now history has taught us, if nothing else, that that flexibility is going to vary quite a bit depending on your facility and the results of the inevitable risk assessment; but presumably you’ve already started the risk assessment process like good little girls and boys, yes? There is a lot of fairly useful (at least at first blush—we also have learned how useful can become useless in the blink of an eye) information to be had in the memo, which you can find here. If you have not yet had a chance to look this over, I would encourage you to do so before you make any “big” decisions on how you’re going to manage these pesky little items (hopefully, this “relief” is not coming too late to avoid having undo sweeping seizures of power strips, etc.).

Maybe it’s Christmas come a bit early (or maybe we just power-shifted into winter), but I would encourage you to unwrap this present very carefully (some assembly required) and try not to break it on the first day…

No doubt there will be questions, so please use this forum as you wish.

Entry Information

Filed Under: CMSEnvironment of careHospital safety

Tags:

Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

RSSPost a Comment  |  Trackback URL

*