August 07, 2013 | | Comments 0
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Alien invasion: Take me to your (Emergency Management) leader!

It’s been a fairly busy year when it comes to updates of standards and such (short of the anticipated adoption of the 2012 Life Safety Code®…as Tom Petty once noted, the waiting is the hardest part, but I digress) and this week we’ll take a look at the new requirements relative to leadership and oversight of the Emergency Management (EM) function. I’m still not entirely certain what we’re gaining by this, unless as a means of ensuring that organizational leadership is inclined to provide sufficient resources to the task of being appropriately prepared for emergencies, but I’m sure it will all be made clear in the fullness of time.

So, we start with LD.04.01.05 which (in EP 5) mandates hospital leaders to identify an individual (and it does say “individual,” not the usual “individual(s)”—sounds like only one person’s going to be on the hook for this) to be accountable for matters of EM that are not within the responsibilities of the incident commander role. This includes such processes as staff implementation of the four phases of EM (mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery); staff implementation of EM across the six critical areas (communications, resources and assets, safety and security, staff roles and responsibilities, utilities, and patient clinical and support activities); collaboration across clinical and operational areas relative to EM; and collaboration with the community relative to EM stuff. I think that’s pretty straightforward and, to be honest, I can’t say that I’ve run into any organizations that have not taken things to this level.

Next up we have LD.04.04.01. EP 25, which ties hospital senior leadership in as the drivers of EM improvements across the organization, including prioritization of improvement opportunities, as well as a specific review of EM planning reviews (a review of the review, if you will) and a review of the emergency response plan (exercises and real events) evaluations. So this speaks to a very specific communications process from the “boots on the ground” EM resources up to senior leadership. This one is very doable and even “done-able” if you’ve been including consideration of EM program evaluations as a function of your annual evaluation of the Environment of Care Management program. Lots of folks are doing this, so this one’s not so much of a stretch.

Finally, we have EM.03.01.03, EPs 13 and 15, which basically establish the requirement to have a specific process for the evaluation of EM exercises and actual response activities. You’re doing this, I am quite certain, but what you might not be succinctly documenting is the multidisciplinary aspect of the evaluation process (don’t forget to include those licensed independent practitioners—we want them at the table). It goes on to the process for reporting the results of the exercise/event evaluations to the EOC committee. Again, I’m pretty confident that this is in place for many (probably most, maybe even all) folks.

That’s the scoop on this. The changes are effective January 1, 2014 and I don’t think this is going to present much of a problem for folks, though please feel free to disagree (if you are so inclined). Certainly what’s being required fits into the framework of processes and activities that are already in place, so less fraught with peril than other changes that could have been made. (I’m still waiting for the influx exercise requirement to be changed to an evacuation exercise requirement. I think we do influx pretty well; evacuation, that’s a whole other kettle of fish.)

Well, while I don’t think that you’d have to include alien invasion on your HVA, if such a thing were to occur, at least we’ll know who to take them to when they ask…

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Filed Under: Emergency managementLife Safety CodeThe Joint Commission

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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