January 22, 2013 | | Comments 2
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One of our subs is missing (with apologies to T. Dolby)

In recent months, I’ve encountered a couple of instances in which some contractors doing various and sundry projects for hospitals did something (what follows is merely my opinion) incredibly boneheaded – namely leaving roof access doors unsecured and unmonitored.

I’ve also encountered some instances in which contractors had gone to lunch (yes – they really were out to lunch!) and left their “work” unattended on a patient care unit (thankfully not a behavioral health unit, but still) – electrical closets open/unsecured, open ceilings, the whole gamut.

Now, one of my favorite observations is that the human race has an enormous capacity for doing stupid stuff (insert whatever relevant current event you think might be apropos evidence of such a sweeping generalization). And while we generally have pretty good controls over the folks who are working for us (that still doesn’t mean nothing will happen, but that measure of control can really pay dividends over time), but—and this seems to be on the increase—when we bring in folks from the outside (nominally because we are a wee bit under-resourced on the home front), we have to relinquish at least some of that control.

So I ask: When it comes to orienting contractor staff, on what topics do you focus? Do you make a general “don’t do anything stupid” statement as well as more specific concerns? I sometimes think that contractors forget about the complexities of providing a safe environment for patients. I honestly don’t think it’s a lack of capacity on anyone’s part, but in the heat of the battle, so to speak, and we’re charging towards a project completion date, etc., sometimes…

Anyone out there want to share any interesting examples of close calls / near misses, or even a sense of what you’ve done/learned to keep things on an even keel during construction/renovation projects involving external contractors? I know I’m not alone on this one – how about a little sharing?

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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  1. This is definitely an ongoing issue in my hospital. All of our on-site vendors and contractors get annual training which goes over basic safety expectations. I still regularly deal with non-compliance, though. This runs the gamut from not wearing hard hats to leaving ladders in the middle of hallways to leaving expensive tools out to propping open roof doors. I’m not sure there is a good solution other than constant vigilance.

  2. I agree with Shane that constant vigilance is needed. One trick that I have used is to have any equipment found to be non-compliant or unattended in the wrong place brought to my office. The subcontractor must then come ask for it from me and I review the regulations with them, call their superior to let them know and then give them the equipment. May be a bit over the top but seem to get their attention. They don’t seem to like to visit the Director’s office.

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