December 26, 2012 | | Comments 0
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Keeping things cool in the hot lab

In reviewing “stuff” from the past few months (September and October were pretty busy on the regulatory front), I wanted to mention (in case this hadn’t crossed your path) the Government Accountability Office’s (GAO) report on the security of radioactive materials in hospitals as a function of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) existing requirements. The GAO found the NRC requirements to be somewhat lacking, based on a sample of 26 hospitals and medical facilities.

According to the highlights of the report (you can find the whole megillah at: www.gao.gov/products/GAO-12-925), the NRC did not agree or disagree with the findings of the report, feeling that existing security requirements are adequate. Some of the security lapses found during the GAO survey were such items as unsecured medical equipment containing radioactive material, unescorted access to radiological sources, even (darn it!) numerical keypad lock combinations inscribed on door frames.

Now I will tell you that this is all stuff I’ve encountered periodically during my consulting life (a boss of mine once told me “you can’t mandate intelligence”; then Ron White distilled that into “you can’t fix stupid”) and I will also tell you that sometimes all you can do is shake your head about this stuff. That said, I have no reason to think that the good folks at The Joint Commission (or indeed anybody else with a horse in the regulatory survey derby) are not abundantly aware of this report and it’s contents. So what follows is purely consultative in nature:

Read the report, look at the recommendations, perform a gap analysis at your facility, identify any improvement opportunities, present the risk assessment to your EOC committee and move forward. You may want to consider identifying the necessity for recurring review (which, natch, you should be doing as a function of your annual evaluation of the security management program), if you think you might lose track of this, but I think this should cover things quite nicely.

For those of you go-getters who’ve already run this race – what kind of stuff did you find? Any suggestions for the rest of the classes? Inquiring minds want to know!

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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