November 19, 2012 | | Comments 0
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Temper Temper(ature)

In the continuing pursuit of every possible question that could ever be asked about eyewash stations, there’s been some chatter recently (as well as some field encounters) relative to what is involved with the weekly operational testing of emergency eyewash equipment, particularly whether or not you have to verify the temperature of the flushing fluid. The “good” news is that while there is a requirement to periodically verify the temperature of the flushing liquid, that period is one that is some 52 weeks in length, so we can put that down for an annual visitation. Having said that, I’m thinking this might be a fine opportunity to cover the basic goals of the weekly test (I find there is frequently a bit of a gap in terms of front-line staff’s understanding of the reasons behind the testing).

Let’s start with the ANSI standard. The intent of the weekly activation from the ANSI perspective is to ensure that there is a flushing fluid supply at the head of the device and to clear the supply line of any sediment buildup that could interfere with flow (that’s why you do the test with the caps on – if the pressure isn’t sufficient to “pop” the caps, then there may be some blockage). Running the water also helps to minimize any contamination due to stagnant water.

Another common question is, “How long should I run the water?” The answer is “It depends.” I think we’ve discussed this before, but once more unto the breach: You have to consider the amount of water contained in the eyewash itself, and the water which is in all the sections of piping that do not form part of a constant circulation (a “dead leg” in the plumbing, as it were). Since water tends to be stagnant in these sections until a flow is activated, you need to run the device long enough to flush out all the stagnant water. This may take a little bit of figuring, but once you’ve figured out the time period, you should be good to go.

You also want to make sure that the eyewash equipment is completely accessible, the protective caps are in place, and someone hasn’t installed a cabinet over the device close enough to result in a head injury if someone tries to use the eyewash (don’t laugh – I’ve whacked my head more than once trying to fit my noggin into a confined eyewash. Yes, I realize that head trauma probably explains a lot, but that is an entirely different topic of conversation). Ultimately, it’s about making sure that if someone gets some bad stuff in their eyes, they have an appropriate means of responding to that exposure. Hopefully, it’s not something we need to use very often, but if we have the eyewash stations, we have to properly maintain them.

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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