March 02, 2011 | | Comments 0
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Mac’s Safety Space: Linens in the ENT clinic

Q: We have been having a discussion about the linens in our ear, nose, and throat (ENT) clinic. This clinic has an esthetician who uses spa wraps and smocks on the patients. Wouldn’t these linens have to be laundered the same as the hospital, as our clinics are under our hospital accreditation and license?

Steve MacArthur: I guess the question I’d have at this point is how are those items being laundered at the moment? It is possible to do a low-temperature wash (<160 degrees F) if appropriate chemicals are used. I’m thinking that we’re generally not dealing with an immune-compromised patient population in this context and maybe a risk assessment and a blessing from Infection Control would suffice.

The other thought I had is to either go with disposable wraps and smocks or perhaps the patients could keep their smocks, maybe as a marketing strategy. As I think about it, is the esthetician providing services under the auspices of the hospital’s accreditation or is it more like when they have hairdressers come in for patients in long-term care, which is sort of like a concession? I think the place to start is finding out what’s happening currently and working from there.

I think a credible risk assessment under the guidance of IC should be able to address any concerns that might come up during survey. Strictly speaking, this probably functions as an offshoot of palliative homeopathic care. I think as long as you approach the whole process in a thoughtful, methodical way, the surveyors will only be impressed at the level of service you are providing to patients. The IC standards all revolve around assessing risk and implementing prudent strategies for managing those risks, so why should this be any different. In fact, the acid test would be for you to submit the question to the SIG—and I bet you’ll get the same “figure it out for yourself” answer.

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Filed Under: CDC/infection controlEnvironment of care

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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