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Mac’s Safety Space: Life Safety Code retractable hooks

Q: I had a Life Safety Code question I was hoping you could help me with when you get a chance. Specifically, our nursing staff wants us to mount retractable stainless steel hooks on the inside of our patient room doors to be used with “gait belts” for physical therapy and for turning patients in their beds. These patient room doors go directly from the patient room into the corridor without any intervening room(s), and the door opens inward (into the patient room). None of these doors are part of a rated smoke or fire wall assembly.

All of our patient room doors are 1 and ¾ inch thick, solid-bonded core wood doors that resist the passage of smoke for up to 20 minutes and have a metal frame. Our hospital is NOT fully sprinkled, which means that some of these doors are in a smoke compartment that is protected throughout by an approved, supervised automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section 19.3.5.2 of Chapter 19, Existing Health Care Occupancies, of the Life Safety Code of 2000, while some are not.

The hooks are mounted on a 4-inch by 4-inch wide stainless steel platform that stands 1 inch high. The platform would be secured to the door by four sheet metal or wood screws that would extend into the door about 1 inch, but would NOT come out the other side. The hook retracts very easily because it is designed to prevent suicides.

Unfortunately, I do not have a manufacturer name or model number, because our nursing department purchased them without checking with us first and now want us to install them. Again, we have a concern about securing this or any other device to corridor doors, but I can’t find a specific reference to this in the Life Safety Code, which is why I’m asking for your help.

A: Happy to be of service. I ran this by my Greeley colleague Brad Keyes and we are in agreement that as long as the doors in question are not fire rated doors or doors that serve a smoke compartment barrier (which you indicated was the case), then there should be no problem from a Life Safety Code perspective . Corridor doors to patient rooms are only required to resist the passage of smoke, regardless whether the smoke compartment has a sprinkler or not.

That said, whenever I encounter folks who are engaging in these types of modifications, I encourage them to check with the local AHJ to run it by them. You certainly know your AHJ better than I do, so you definitely have a better sense of how to (or even if to) approach this. I’ve just seen too many folks that went ahead with the modification without checking with the locals, only to have to undo everything when someone gets a hair across their posterior because they weren’t consulted (and I suspect you know if you have that type of a personality in the mix).