August 19, 2007 | | Comments 0
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Risk assessments and Swiss Army knives

Here’s a quick word, of no doubt many to come, about risk assessments.

If you have a condition, regardless of its nature, that requires something of a formal invocation of the risk assessment process, I cannot advise more strongly that you periodically take the assessment out and look at it.

Yes, I know that The Joint Commission standards do not indicate a recurring frequency for risk assessments (though that is changing – check out the revised emergency management standards). However, as a safety professional, do you really believe that a single risk assessment lasts forever? I didn’t think so.

I can tell you with something approaching certainty that the conditions you assess today (or assessed two years ago) are not static. Your patient population is likely to go through incremental, if not dramatic, changes in diagnosis, acuity, etc.

For example, my primary base of practice is in Massachusetts, and I can tell you that as the municipal system for managing behavioral health patients has evolved (though “devolved” is probably the more appropriate descriptor), the challenges facing community hospitals has changed dramatically. Keeping patients and staff safe is not a one-time proposition.

First use the risk assessment process to identify improvement opportunities for your EC program. Then, use the data collected in the wake of interventions to drive your annual EC evaluations. There is not a risk or practical application for which you could not employ the risk assessment. The risk assessment acts as a veritable Swiss Army knife for the safety professional.

Steve Mac.

smacarthur@greeley.com

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Steve MacArthur About the Author: Steve MacArthur is a safety consultant with The Greeley Company in Danvers, Mass. He brings more than 30 years of healthcare management and consulting experience to his work with hospitals, physician offices, and ambulatory care facilities across the country. He is the author of HCPro's Hospital Safety Director's Handbook and is contributing editor for Briefings on Hospital Safety. Contact Steve at stevemacsafetyspace@gmail.com.

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