HIPAA Handbooks

  • Privacy and security training for new and seasoned staff
  • 11 staff/setting focus areas
  • Education on protecting PHI
  • New HITECH Act changes
  • Discounts on bulk purchases

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E-learning

  • Role-based training using real-life case scenarios
  • Test-your-knowledge exercises with remediation
  • Post-course test to document staff participation

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Other HIPAA Resources

  • Hot-topic audio conferences
  • Books on privacy and security
  • Newsletters
  • e-Newsletter
  • Videos


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Submit your HIPAA questions to Editoquestionr John Castelluccio at jcastelluccio@hcpro.com and we will work with our experts to provide the information you need.

Q: Can family members of a deceased patient obtain the medical records of the deceased if it is relevant to their own plan of care and family history?

A: Yes. The HIPAA Privacy Rule allows covered entities (CE) to disclose a deceased person’s PHI to family members and others involved in the person’s care or payment for care prior to his death, unless doing so is inconsistent with any prior expressed preference of the deceased person that was known to the CE. Information released to these individuals should be limited to the minimum necessary. If a complete copy of the patient’s record is requested, obtain written authorization from the executor of the deceased person’s estate or his next of kin, as prescribed by state law.

Editor’s note: Mary Brandt, MBA, RHIA, CHE, CHPS, answered this question for HCPro’s Briefings on HIPAA. This information does not constitute legal advice. Consult legal counsel for answers to specific privacy and security questions.

Categories : HIPAA Q&A
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chklist_paperDear healthcare professional,

Medical Records Briefing (MRB) is conducting its benchmarking survey on electronic health record implementation, and we would appreciate your input. Please take a few moments to complete this survey.

To show our thanks, we will select one respondent at random to win a complimentary HCPro webcast of his or her choice. To enter to win, please include your contact information at the end of the survey once you have answered the questions.

Entering your contact information will also enable us to email you the results of the survey along with commentary from industry experts. The results will also be featured in the October 2015 issue of MRB.

The link below will take you to the survey’s website; simply click on the link to answer the survey questions online. If the click-through does not work, please copy and paste the URL below into the address bar of your browser.

Here’s the link to the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/W5QVJPD

Thank you for your input!

Sincerely,

Jaclyn Fitzgerald
Editor, Medical Records Briefing
HCPro
jfitzgerald@hcpro.com

Categories : EHRs
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Submit your HIPAA questions to Editoquestionr John Castelluccio at jcastelluccio@hcpro.com and we will work with our experts to provide the information you need.

Q: Is it considered a HIPAA violation for facilities and clinics to keep patient charts outside of exam rooms or at a patient’s bedside? Most providers prefer to have the charts handy to review just before seeing the patient; however, I am unsure of whether this would be an incidental disclosure, as anyone walking by could access the chart.

A: This practice is acceptable if you take steps to limit the amount of information available and limit those who have access. For example, a bedside chart should contain minimal information needed for that day’s care, such as an intake/output record, medication administration record, and nurses’ notes. The patient’s entire record should not be kept at the bedside for family members and visitors to access. Read More→

Categories : HIPAA privacy
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The National Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (NCCoE) is publishing a new series of guides to show healthcare professionals and organizations how to improve their cybersecurity measures to protect health information systems with standards-based, commercially available, or open-source tools.

The NCCoE released a draft version of the first guide in the series, “Securing Electronic Records on Mobile Devices,” July 23 for public comment. The step-by-step guide demonstrates how to use smartphones or tablets for patient care without spreading sensitive data across the digital stratosphere.

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Cyber criminals hacked into part of a computer network at UCLA Health System in California, compromising records of at least 4.5 million people, the university hospital system reported on Friday.

There is no evidence yet the hackers obtained access to or acquired individuals’ PHI, although the compromised areas of the network do contain names, addresses, birthdates, Social Security numbers, medical record numbers, Medicare or health plan numbers, and other medical information, according to a statement from UCLA Health.

The health system is working with the FBI and has also hired private computer forensic experts to secure information on network servers.

Read More→