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Conference Corner: Shipping out to Vegas!

If you’ve ever felt that your luggage always ends up too heavy, taking a trip down to the loading dock to see the pallets shipping out to the 10th annual ACDIS conference in Las Vegas would certainly make you feel better about your bag.

pallet fun

Linnea Archibald (left) and Penny Richards (right) joining in on the packing fun.

Though we already extended our thanks to the internal staff who make the ACDIS conference possible, the team putting this conference together deserve another round of applause. On Tuesday, the office management team finished packing up the pallets to ship to the conference. CCDS Coordinator Penny Richards and ACDIS Editor Linnea Archibald ventured down to the loading dock to see the process in action and were thoroughly impressed.

On the dock were five pallets ready to go onto the truck – each wrapped in cellophane and jam packed with ACDIS supplies. Here are a few of the items making the trek to Vegas:

  • More than 2,000 tote bags with goodies included
  • More than 2,000 event agendas, exhibit hall floor plans, program guides, and exhibitor directories
  • Close to 50 signs and posters
  • Office and setup supplies such as batteries, clips, box cutters, calculators, envelopes, extension cords, first aid kits, pens, scissors, and more
  • More than 600 pieces of pre-con materials
  • Book store merchandise
  • The ACDIS Achievement Awards

There’s no way the ACDIS conference would be as spectacular without the many staff members working behind the scenes. When you arrive at the conference, look around and imagine packing all that in your roll-around suitcase!

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The pallets packed and ready to go!

Conference Corner: Thanks to our internal staff!

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Staff answer questions and work at the ACDIS booth

The days are winding down to the long awaited 10th annual ACDIS conference. Next week, more than 30 members of our HCPro and BLR teammates will make their way to the airport to support the ACDIS community during the largest conference we have ever conducted—with more than 1,500 paid attendees, 50 exhibitors, upwards of 300 exhibitor attendees, and more than 90 speakers and presenters.

In addition to the core ACDIS team, dozens of people lend their time, energy, and innumerable talents. When put all together, they produce the thriving conference we will experience in Las Vegas. We hope you’ll join us in thanking our staff members who make the conference possible.

While it would be nearly impossible to name every single person who contributed in some way, we’re going to give it our best shot:

Shannon Storella and the entire events team: Shannon is our fearless leader throughout the conference, from the planning stages to the live event. She keeps us all in line and helps the event run as smoothly as possible.

Kathy Wilson does an amazing job holding the entire event together working between the various departments as well as with the hotel staff and conference center management to ensure everything stays inline. The conference wouldn’t be as successful (or fun) without her!

Our conference presenters have gotten to know Wendy Walsh (or W2, as she sometimes signs her emails) very well over the past six to eight months. She is our conference producer, helping guide the speakers from the planning stages of their presentations through to execution at the actual conference. She keeps track of speakers’ presentations, makes sure their travel arrangements are set, ensures their presentations meet ANCC continuing education requirements, and a host of other tasks required to keep the sessions full of quality information. She helps prepare our room moderators to produce the best session experience possible.

Maggie Gagnon does a fantastic job both behind the scenes leading up to the conference and throughout the conference to generally ensure that the entire event runs smoothly.

Jess Carbone is the brain behind our ACDIS conference App, adds messaging, uploads materials, and trains the rest of the ACDIS staff on how to use the App. We love seeing the attendees interact through the app and post updates from the sessions.

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Staff working at the registration desks

Mary Ann Genovese, Kerry Neenan, Jennifer Hollis, and the rest of our exhibit hall support staff do a great job working with exhibitors and organizing floor plans, and assisting and directing attendees during the conference.

Andrea Kraynak, Stephen Andrews, Nicole Votta, Rebecca Hendren, Linnea Archibald, Sharme Brodie, Allen Frady, Shannon McCall, and Wendy Walsh: These lovely people will be our room moderators for our five session tracks, making sure the sessions ran as smoothly as possible. They’ll let you know where the bathrooms are, ask you to silence your cell phones, and remind you to use the microphones to ask your questions at the close of the session. They will keep the rest of the conference group updated via the App on interesting quotes and tidbits from each presentation as well.

Sheila McGrath, Erin Smith, Sarah Devlin, Melissa Varnavas, Penny Richards, and everyone in the ACDIS booth will be available to explain the various books, pocket guides, newsletters, and other products available to help CDI programs train their staff and grow. In between sessions, the booth will be open to attendees who wish to make a purchase or ask a question, and they will be ready and eager to help.

Mary Ann Genovese, Kerry Neenan, Jennifer Hollis, and the rest of our exhibit hall support staff do a great job working with exhibitors and organizing floor plans, and assisting and directing attendees during the conference.

Melissa Ketelsen (in customer service in our Tennessee office), Shannon McCall, Dave Garvey (both onsite) and our registration folks make the registration process run so smoothly, and for answering attendee’s questions, fixing or replacing badges, and providing support throughout the conference.

Casey Thomas, Mike Mirabello, Matt Sharpe, Mollika Sun and AnnMarie Lemoine do a fantastic job organizing ALL of the pieces here in the office that gets shipped to the conference! Their efforts ensure that we have everything we need to run a successful event onsite.

The list goes on, and surely we’ve still left off a few names! It takes a huge group of people to make the conference as spectacular as it always is. The conference wouldn’t be what it is without the effort of each and every person on this team.

Conference Corner: Make time to check out the Poster Session at the Conference in Las Vegas

By Penny Richards, CCDS Coordinator and Member Services Specialist

2016 Poster Session

2016 Poster Session

Along with a dizzying number of education sessions at the ACDIS Conference in Las Vegas next month will be the annual Poster Session. These science fair-style presentations allow a selected group of your colleagues to present their CDI team and facility’s challenges and success stories, condensed onto a poster. Posters will be on display throughout the conference in the Exhibit Hall.

Presenters will be on hand during the morning break on Thursday, May 11, (10:15 to 11:15 a.m.) to talk to you about their poster and answer your questions. You’re sure to come away from the Poster Session with great ideas to incorporate into your CDI program to help build your own success story.

2016 Poster Presenters

2016 Poster Presenters

Here is a list of topics you’ll find at this year’s Poster Session:

  • CDI Report Card: Physician CDI Education
  • How to Avoid a Query Initiative: Educating the Physicians
  • Implementation of the Stop Sepsis Collaborative
  • CDI 2.0: Education for the Newer CDI
  • CDS Competency Validation
  • Putting the PSI in CDI
  • Key Chart Reviews Using SharePoint
  • Improved SOI and ROM Documentation
  • Provider Perspective on Charting Compliance and Query Success
  • Pediatric Malnutrition
  • CDS Coverage and Query Delivery
  • Remote CDI Challenges and Solutions

    Browsing the posters

    Browsing the posters

  • Shared Note Query in EPIC
  • Growth and Success at Tidelands Health System
  • Building a Successful CDS Team
  • Finding Data Hidden in Obstetrics and Prenatal Records
  • Career Ladder: Review Assignments by Units
  • A Retrospective Denials Review
  • Strategies to Improve Provider Query Response Rates
  • Out DRG Analysis and Review Taskforce (DART).
  • Our successful CDI/HII (Health Information Integrity) Remote Team
  • Transition from Traditional CDI Practices to Innovative CDI Practices
  • Shift from Regional to a System Approach to CDI
  • CDI in the Rehab Setting
  • Physician Engagement with TEMPO Board Rounds
  • MS-DRG Groupers Assigned to the MDC 24
  • Revitalizing a CDI Program to Promote Orientation of New Staff
  • Daily CDI Huddle: Team Meeting
  • Oncology Documentation: Improving SOI and ROM
  • Development and Implementation of a CDI Ladder
  • Impact CDS Impact on Quality Reporting and Documentation Accuracy
  • From Failing to Exceeding Goal in Three Months
  • Financial Impact of CDS in Critical Access Hospitals
  • Candyland: A Fun Look at CDIs and Physicians Engagement
  • Complications of Care: A Retrospective Review

You will find a list of all of the posters in your conference bag so you can make notes of which topics you find particularly interesting for follow up after the conference.

We will take photos of each poster and put them on the ACDIS website after the conference. We will also post a one-page description written by the presenter, including their contact information, so you can reach out for more helpful information about their topic.

Maybe you will present your success to conference attendees in 2018!

Conference Conversations: What are ACDIS speakers looking forward to most?

ACDIS 2017

ACDIS 2017

“It’s in Vegas. Need I say more?” jokes William E. Haik, MD, FCCP, CDIP, who presents “Sepsis: 1, 2, 3—RAC Attack!” on Day 1, in Track 1, at 1:45 p.m.

Hardly a week goes by without a mention of sepsis in the medical literature, whether peer-reviewed scientific journals or non-peer-reviewed medical publications. Recently, more evidence has surfaced that seems to support the importance of Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) in the risk assessment of sepsis patients, according to a recent White Paper on the topic from the ACDIS Advisory Board. And there continues to be conflict between clinical language, coding language, and the language required by quality assessment programs. (Read the related White Paper on the topic on the ACDIS website.)

But Haik, a founding member of the ACDIS Advisory Board, has a knack for breaking complicated clinical and coding conditions into manageable pieces of information, providing concrete examples of what clinical indicators CDI specialists should look for in the medical record and how to best craft a query to convey the patient’s condition in codeable terminology. Just as he has a knack for a quick comeback and rich and hearty laughter.

“We arm wrestle during my talk,” he says. “Just kidding,” he adds. “In reality, I’m trying to get participants to think inside the box! I want to get everyone to think clinically as a physician would.”

Striking a serious tone, he adds that presentations on quality, hierarchical condition categories, and value-based purchasing represent topics of interest. “I’m really looking forward to expanding my knowledge,” he says.

He’s not alone. The 10th annual conference features many physician presentations including that of Ronald Hirsch, MD, vice president of the regulations and education group at AccretivePAS Clinical Solutions, who presents on Day 2, Track 4, 11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.

Hirsch knows how CMS’ regulations and guidance can confuse even the most astute clinician with its vague and often contradictory instructions. Nevertheless, these regulations affect everyone—doctor, patient, bedside nurse, case manager, CDI, billing and coding, even healthcare executives.

While his presentation “Medicare Regulation Update: Practical Application for CDI Professionals” promises to shed a light on this often opaque information, Hirsch is looking forward to learning just as much from his peers and other breakout sessions throughout the conference.

2016 pre-cons

2016 pre-cons

“With the breadth of courses available at the conference, I expect to walk out with a much deeper understanding of CDI. I can’t wait for the pre-conference physician advisor Boot Camp. It will be an honor to hear from Erica Remer and James Kennedy, two of the most renowned physicians in CDI,” Hirsch says.

Fellow physician, Nicole Fox, MD, MPH, FACS, CPE, medical director of pediatric trauma and CDI at Cooper University Health Care in Camden, New Jersey “cannot wait to hear about other program’s successes,” she says.

Fox, who presents “Playing to Win: How to Engage Physicians in Clinical Documentation Improvement,” on Day 3, Track 3, from 11 a.m. to noon, says she’s particularly interested in ambulatory CDI as Cooper University plans for its next area of growth and expansion.

Just as Fox looks forward to hearing other people’s CDI success stories, she’s excited to share her own, too. “One of the strengths of our program is physician engagement,” she says. “Physicians are never taught how to document, so they struggle with this much-needed skill set and are often hesitant to ask for help.”

Cooper University’s CDI program, however, tracks a 100% response rate to its CDI department queries, a rate at least partially attributed to the peer-to-peer education Fox helped establish.

“I think one of the general challenges with physician engagement is not recognizing that the best way for physicians. There is no substitute for a practicing physician embedded in your CDI program who will proactively educate peers and handle any concerns that arise,” she says.

Cooper University also has a remote component to its CDI program. Past ACDIS Achievement Award winner Kara Masucci, RN, MSN, CCDS, and her manager Rebecca R. Willcutt, RN, BSN, CCS, CCDS who both work at Cooper University, join Boston Medical Center’s Lara M. Faustino, RN, BSN, CCDS for a panel discussion on Day 2, Track 2, at 9:15-10:15 a.m., for a panel discussion on remote CDI efforts.

General session networking

General session networking

Like Fox, Faustino’s looking forward to learning from industry experts and peers and, of course, “networking! I always enjoy learning from a variety of CDI professionals from across the nation and it always amazes me how very similar we are, or how vastly different we approach the same types of challenges.”

When Jeff Morris, RN, BSN, CCDS, now CDI supervisor at University of South Alabama Health System in Mobile, first started in the role it was as a liaison between coding and physician staff to provide documentation education related to ICD-10 specificity. With numerous ICD-10 delays, however, Morris transformed the program, added staff, and expanded into focus areas such as CDI in obstetrics and gynecology, which he’ll explore on Day 1, Track 5, at 3:45 p.m.

“I am most looking forward to the networking and collaboration that occurs between CDI professionals during these few days. I always leave the conference refreshed and full of new ideas to bring back and implement at my facility,” Morris says.

There’s a lot to get excited about this year, especially with the 10th anniversary festivities. What sessions are you looking forward to most? What’s your favorite part of the ACDIS conference every year?

Lunchtime

Lunchtime catch-ups

Conference Conversations: Fox helps make CDI programs “physician-friendly”

Fox, Nicole

Nicole Fox, MD, MPH, FACS, CPE

Editor’s Note: The ACDIS Conference is only a little over two months away. Over the coming weeks, we’ll take some time to introduce members to a few of this year’s speakers. The conference takes place May 9-12, at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, Nevada. Today, we talked to Nicole Fox, MD, MPH, FACS, CPE, the medical director of pediatric trauma and CDI at Cooper University Health Care in Camden, New Jersey, who will be presenting “Playing to Win: How to Engage Physicians in Clinical Documentation Improvement.” Currently, Fox leads a team of 13 CDI specialists and achieved a 100% physician response rate to queries.

Q: What has been the biggest challenge you faced with physician engagement at your facility?

A: Actually one of the strengths of our program is physician engagement. We have a 100% response rate to our CDI queries. I think one of the general challenges with physician engagement is not recognizing that the best way for physicians to receive information is peer-to-peer. There is no substitute for a practicing physician embedded in your CDI program who will proactively educate peers and handle any concerns that arise. Physicians are never taught how to document, so they struggle with this much-needed skill set and are often hesitant to ask for help. But, they respond most effectively to one of their peers.

Q:  What are three things attendees can expect from your session?

A: Attendees can expect an interactive, dynamic presentation. They will have tangible “take-aways” to help make their CDI program physician friendly. They also will have tools to handle difficult physicians.

Q:  What one tool can CDI professionals not live without?

A: An engaged medical director for their program.

Q: In what ways does your session challenge CDI professionals to think outside the box?

A: This session challenges non-physicians to see CDI from a physician’s perspective and really evaluate their own program to determine whether or not they are set up for success in terms of physician engagement.

Q: What are you most looking forward to about this year’s conference?

A: I cannot wait to hear about other program’s successes, particularly with ambulatory CDI which is our next area of growth and expansion.

Q: Fun question: what’s your favorite breakfast food?

A: An egg white burrito with quinoa and black beans. It’s awesome with tomatillo sauce. They make a great one at the Wynn Hotel café in Vegas, so try one while you are out at the ACDIS conference.

 

Conference update: MGM Grand hotel discount for ACDIS ends 4/12

MGM Grand exterior hero shot

Don’t miss the hotel discount cut off rate! It ends Tuesday, April 12!

My first trip to Las Vegas was back in 2006. I was a novice traveler at best. Luckily, I was in good company with my team of coworkers. My husband also came with us. With his schedule free, he’d take a swim in the hotel lap pool in the morning, meet me out by the fountains near the hotel’s cabanas for lunch, and have a snack and wine ready for me in our hotel room when the work day is done. We were there over our first anniversary and my sister and brother-in-law ordered us a dozen chocolate covered strawberries and champagne delivered to our hotel room. After the conference ended, we stayed over and spent a beautifully relaxing afternoon floating in pool, slushy drinks in hand.

Beyond reminiscing about a favorite memory, I share this personal story simply to let you know that the MGM Grand, where ACDIS’ 10th Annual celebration takes place in less than a month, is quite the place.

But if you haven’t booked your room yet, time is almost out. There’s only a few more days left to get a discounted hotel room rate for the ACDIS Conference. Reserve your room by April 12 to take full advantage of the discount. The conference takes place from May 9-12 at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

When you book your hotel room by April 12, you’ll get the discounted room rate at the MGM Grand for $169, plus a $30 daily resort fee (tax and fees not included).

Make sure to check the dates of your hotel reservation as there may not be availability on the days surrounding the conference. If you plan on extending your stay in Las Vegas for personal reasons, keep in mind that you may need to change hotel accommodations.

While you book your hotel room, make sure to check out the three special, pre-conference educational opportunities:

Many long-time ACDIS attendees have come to know my hubby over the years (he was the guy passing out the extra t-shirts in Nashville and helping at the registration desk in San Antonio, among other sightings). Unfortunately, he can’t come with us this year. He’ll be back at home teaching his middle school students biology, art, and music, and taking care of our two cats Hugo and Katrina. But I do plan to have a soak in the pool and slushy in his honor.

Conference Conversations: Brant offers insight into recovery auditor programs

barbara brant

Barbara Brant, MPA, RN, CCDS, CDIP, CCS

Editor’s Note: Over the coming weeks leading up to the conference, we’ll take some time to introduce members to a few of this year’s speakers. The conference takes place May 9-12, at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, Nevada. Today, we spoke with Barbara Brant, MPA, RN, CCDS, CDIP, CCS, a senior consultant with Cotiviti Health Care, presenting “CDI Specialists: Impact Potential in the Audit Process.” Since 2005, she has been involved in the development, implementation, and auditing of CDI programs. Brant has assisted health systems with ICD-10 Gap Analyses and created ICD-10-CM educational materials for specialty physician groups. Currently, she provides training and clinical support for DRG auditors. She lives in Camp Hill, Pennsylvania with her husband Marty.

 

Q: What do you think CDI specialists’ biggest misconceptions about the Recovery Auditor program are?

A: There are really three main misconceptions:

  1. Denials are determined without complete review of the documentation
  2. Recovery Auditor’s only look for “gotcha” errors
  3. CMS Recovery Audit programs are performed to only take back

Q: Recovery Auditors are not at the top of anyone’s best friend list in healthcare, but what important purpose do they serve?

A: The goal of any audit is to identify problematic issues. The purpose of CMS’ Recovery Auditors is to identify and prevent improper payments. Therefore, Recovery Auditors serve a purpose by encouraging healthcare providers to work for solutions to correct identified problems, stabilize provider revenue cycles, and ensure accurate payments for payers.

 

Q: What are three things attendees can expect from your session?

A: The three things that attendees can expect are

  1. To understand that Recovery Auditors perform very comprehensive reviews of all documentation provided.
  2. To obtain knowledge that the guidance for recommended reimbursement changes (higher or lower) is based on extensive peer-reviewed research of best-practices, clinical consensus data and Official Coding Guidelines.
  3. To use information from this session for improved denial data due to CDI performance improvements.

 

Q: In what ways does your session challenge CDI professionals to think outside the box?

A: To encourage use of retrospective audit data to concurrently improve problematic documentation

 

Q: What are you most looking forward to about this year’s conference?

A: Interaction with colleagues and to stay updated on CDI’s expanding roles within the revenue cycle

 

Q: Fun question: what’s your favorite movie?

A: A Christmas Story – a perfectly imperfect loving family!

 

Conference Conversations: Morris ventures into CDI for OB/GYN

14-Jeff Morris

Jeff Morris, RN, BSN, CCDS

Editor’s Note: Over the coming weeks, we’ll take some time to introduce members to a few of this year’s ACDIS conference speakers. The conference takes place May 9-12, at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, Nevada. Today, we talked with Jeff Morris, RN, BSN, CCDS, the supervisor of clinical documentation improvement (CDI) at University of South Alabama Health System in Mobile, Alabama, who is presenting “CDI in Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Roadmap to Program Development and Success.” Morris has 20 years of nursing experience in adult critical care, medical-surgical/telemetry, and emergency department (ED). Morris was the first CDI specialist hired at USA Children’s and Women’s and now has five years of experience in CDI. He is an active member of ACDIS and is an Alabama ACDIS Chapter leader.

Q: Could you tell me a bit about the why your facility developed its CDI program?

A: Initially, our organization hired CDI specialists to be liaisons between our coding and provider staff to provide documentation education related to ICD-10 specificity. With numerous ICD-10 delays, we transformed from a non-traditional program to a traditional program and added additional staff members.

Q: What are three things attendees can expect from your session?

A: Let me give you a list:

  • Determine the need for CDI reviews of OB-GYN records at an individual facility and begin implementation of such a program
  • Become familiar with Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting and AHA Coding Clinics specific to the OB-GYN patient population
  • Identify strategies for program success, program maintenance, and metrics to monitor

Q: What is one tool a CDI professional cannot live without?

A: The CDI Pocket Guide, it’s an invaluable resource that all CDI specialists should have.

Q: In what ways does your session challenge CDI professionals to think outside the box?

A: I am happy to be co-presenting this session with Beverly Lambert, RN, BSN, our main CDI contact in the OB/GYN patient population at our organization. OB/GYN is a patient population most CDI programs do not review. There are many documentation nuances that are very specific to this patient population, but there are also commonalities.

Q: What are you most looking forward to about this year’s conference?

A: I am most looking forward to the networking and collaboration that occurs between CDI professionals during these few days. I always leave the conference refreshed and full of new ideas to bring back and implement at my facility.

Q: Fun question: What is your favorite breakfast food?

A: French toast. We have a place in town that has awesome bananas foster French toast!

 

Conference Update: Things to do in Las Vegas, part 2

ACDIS Conference Corner

ACDIS Conference Corner

Last week on the blog, we provided readers with a list of fun indoor activities to keep you busy when you’re not in the conference. If hiking and adventuring are more your speed, though, the Las Vegas area offers a wide range of attractions for you as well.

Below is a list of suggested activities for the outdoor enthusiast. Enjoy!

To read our list of indoor activities, click here.

  1. Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area: Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, located 20 miles from Las Vegas Strip, allows visitors to hike, picnic, and view plant and animal life under 3,000-foot-high red rock formations. It’s open daily 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Learn more at http://www.redrockcanyonlv.org/.
  1. Valley of Fire: The Valley of Fire is a 35,000-square-mile state park, named for the magnificent red sandstone formations formed from great shifting sand dunes during the age of the dinosaurs more than 150 million years ago (Mesozoic Era). These brilliant sandstone formations can appear to be on fire when reflecting the sun’s rays. It is located in the Mojave Desert approximately 58 miles northeast of the Las Vegas. Learn more at valley-of-fire.com/.
  1. Boulder City: Boulder City is located about 20 miles outside Las Vegas (and on the way to the Hoover Dam). You’ll find great restaurants, shopping, and antique stores. Learn more at bcnv.com.
  1. Hoover Dam: No trip to the area is complete without a stop at the Hoover Dam. The damn holds back the waters of Lake Mead and straddles the border between Nevada and Arizona. You can take a bus tour from the Strip. Learn more at vegas.com/attractions/near-las-vegas/hoover-dam/.
  1. Ghost towns: There is a way to step back into the Silver State’s astonishing past. Dotting the vast landscape of Nevada are countless ghost towns, and while indecipherable ruins and tumbleweeds mark some, others are surprisingly intact. Either way, these remarkable places are portals into a Nevada of old and certainly worth a wander. Learn more at lvlg.com/lasvegas/attracts/ghstwns.htm.

 

Conference Update: Attendance proposal for the 10th annual ACDIS conference

Editor’s Note: CDI professionals wishing to earn support from program administrators to attend the ACDIS 10th Annual Conference may adapt the following proposal.

To whom it may concern:

I would like to attend the ACDIS conference in Las Vegas, May 9-12, 2017.

Understanding the limitation of our CDI program professional development budget, I want to outline why attendance represents a worthy expense.

The acdis conference offers a diverse range of sessions on the latest trends and techniques to enhance not just my own professional skills, but will afford me education I can bring back to our facility to share with our entire CDI program. The 2017 conference features more than two full days of training and education and networking opportunities, with five concurrent tracks featuring a diverse range of topics including best practices for staff management, physician engagement, clinically focused chart reviews, and critical regulatory updates to improve every aspect of our CDI department.

Here is a link to the conference webpage, which includes the complete agenda.

ACDIS always offers pre-conference events that we may also want consider including  a Risk Adjustment Documentation and Coding Boot Camp, another on Building a Best Practice CDI Team, and a third on The Physician Advisor Role in CDI.

The conference offers us an opportunity to meet and problem-solve with CDI experts. We can learn first-hand from the experiences of others which makes this an opportunity we cannot afford to miss.

 

Specifically, I want to attend the conference to get information or help with:

  1. <Fill in>
  2. <Fill in>
  3. <Fill in>

Here is an estimation of the cost to send me to the ACDIS Conference. The cost of conference includes the cost of some breakfasts and lunches:

Hotel: Three nights at $199*, for a total of $597 (hotels fill quickly so we should reserve as soon as possible).

*The hotel is charging a mandatory daily resort fee of $30 which includes access to the fitness center, Wi-Fi in the room, a daily newspaper, local and toll free numbered calls, and limited access to the business center including notary services and boarding pass printing.

Registration: $1,005 (early-bird discount is $905); ACDIS member $905 (early bird $805)

Airfare/travel is a cost I haven’t estimated.

I am requesting approval so we can take advantage of the early-bird registration rate of only $805 (if we’re ACDIS members) if we register before March 7, 2017. If we send the team, the fifth person registers for free (which we may wish to take advantage of).

If we are approved, we can further discuss which sessions might be best to attend to benefit our overall program. And, of course, we’ll meet after the conference to discuss significant takeaways, tips, and recommended actions to maximize our investment in our CDI program. I will also share relevant information with the team and other staff.

Thank you for considering this request. Again, if I get approval now, then we can save up to $200 on the registration, and keep our total investment to about $2,000. I look forward to your reply.

Thank you!

[Name]