RSSAll Entries Tagged With: "ask ACDIS"

Q&A: Acute pulmonary insufficiency

Have CDI questions?

Have CDI questions?

Q: What should we do about the documentation of “acute pulmonary insufficiency?” What indicators are you using for this in comparison to querying for acute respiratory failure? Acute pulmonary insufficiency is an MCC following surgery but it is also a potential patient safety indicator (PSI) if it’s failure. 

A: Our process is to review the chart and see if it meets clinical evidence for additional specificity such as acute respiratory failure. If it does not, does it meet clinical evidence for acute respiratory distress (now that there is a new code for that condition)? If it does not, then our CDI teams would not query. If it does meet the criteria, we would add all the relevant information from the record on the query and ask the physician if, in his or her medical opinion, the documented acute pulmonary insufficiency could be further specified. [more]

Q&A: Tracking denials

denials poll

Did you know 55% say CDI is involved in the denials management and appeals process?

Q: When looking at denials timelines, what information should be noted?

A: There are many critical time elements to capture during the denial appeals process. It is recommended that you add these to your denials database. If that is not possible, an alternative spreadsheet or database should be developed. The first date to track is the date that the denial or remittance advice (zero or underpayment) was received. The amount of time allowed to file your appeal will vary from payer to payer. When tracking timelines, it is important to note the: [more]

Q&A: Acceptable documentation for HCCs

Have CDI questions?

Have CDI questions?

Q: What clinical documentation is acceptable to pull Hierarchical Condition Category (HCC) information from for reporting purposes? Would you code from history of present illness, past medical history, active problem list, or the assessment?

A: Follow the coding guidelines when reporting diagnosis codes for HCC purposes. The coding guidelines don’t change with HCCs. As long as the documentation meets the MEAT (monitored, evaluated, assessed, treated) criteria, it can be reported from anywhere in the note. [more]

Q&A: Coding mixed cardiogenic and septic shock

Have CDI questions?

Have CDI questions?

Q: If the attending documented, “likely mixed cardiogenic and septic shock,” can I assign codes R57.0 and R65.21?

A: Refer to the documentation within the code book. If you open the book to the R57 code grouping (Shock not elsewhere classified) listed below there is an Excludes1 note. Remember, Excludes 1 notes instruct us that we cannot use codes from this grouping with those listed within the Excludes 1 note. Cardiogenic shock (R57.2) falls within this grouping. Also listed is R65.2 septic shock. Purely relying on the coding conventions, I would conclude that we cannot code septic shock with cardiogenic shock. See the image below. [more]

Q&A: Reporting right-sided heart

SharmeBrodie_May2017

Sharme Brodie RN, CCDS, answered this week’s CDI question.

Q: If you have an acute exacerbation of a chronic right heart failure (CHF) with a preserved ejection fraction (EF)— above 55%—can you code it as heart failure with preserved EF? All the clinical symptoms are exemplifying right failure. For example, ascites, pronounced neck vein distension, swelling of ankles and feet, etc.

A: ICD-10-CM has codes associated with the documentation of right-sided failure and for left-sided failure. Each ventricle supplies different portions of the circulation, so heart failure can be described as either right or left depending on the symptoms. When the right ventricle fails, we call it right-heart failure. In this case, fluid backs up into the peripheral circulation, into the legs, head, and the liver. Right-sided or right ventricular (RV) heart failure usually occurs as a result of left-sided failure. [more]

Q&A: Credentialing for outpatient CDI

Have CDI questions?

Have CDI questions?

Q: I’ve heard lately that outpatient CDI specialists are less likely to be registered nurses. Is there a reason there may be more coders in this arena?

A: While many outpatient CDI specialists do hold an RN credential, there are good reasons for having coders fill the roll, says Allen Frady, RN, BSN, CCDS, CCS, CDI education specialist for HCPro in Middleton, Massachusetts.

“There are a lot of very specific documentation requirements for evaluation and management (E/M), observation codes, interventional radiology, etc., which RN CDI specialists don’t typically learn,” he says. Additionally, coders may already be comfortable working in a physician practice setting and have a familiarity with hierarchical condition categories (HCC). [more]

Q&A: Receiving query responses from providers

Have CDI questions?

Have CDI questions?

Q: Our hospital is having a hard time getting our physicians to respond to queries, do you have any suggestions on how to get them to reply?

A: The most important thing is make sure the query is concise and contains clinical indicators from the record. You also want to use different methods of contacting the physician as well. Various points of contact include within the electronic health record, via e-mail, by phone, or by having your CDI team visit them on the floor. [more]

Q&A: Denial management teams

Have CDI questions?

Have CDI questions?

Q: What guidance do you have for building a denial management team?

A: As with any team, it is important to have the right players working together with identified roles and responsibilities established for each. The members of the denials management team should be representative of departments with a direct tie to the various types of denials. Include the following groups: [more]

Q&A: Coding chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus

LauriePrescott_May 2017

Laurie L. Prescott, RN, MSN, CCDS, CDIP, answered this question

Q: Let’s say a provider documented chronic kidney disease (CKD), 2/2 hypertension (HTN), and diabetes mellitus (DM), and the stage of CKD was not specified, but lab results show patient was in stage 2. Could I assign codes for CKD, stage unspecified, Hypertensive CKD w/ stage 1-4, and Type II DM. Do I need to assign a separate code for HTN?

A: Let’s break down the documentation.

CKD secondary to HTN and DM: With this documentation, we have two combination codes to assign—hypertensive CKD and diabetic CKD. We would also assign a code to reflect the stage of the CKD.

[more]

Q&A: Electronic query formatting

Have CDI questions?

Have CDI questions?

Q: We use an electronic system at our hospital, and find it is difficult to query a physician since we all have our own processes. Would you recommend having a set format for a query that is used electronically?

A: This is going to be contingent on the system your facility uses.

Some EHRs have pretty complex platforms that will allow you to build templates and write a narrative. Here you would write your question, provide all of the appropriate details, and there would be a more formatted, outlined section below where the individual leaving the query can populate the form within that template.

[more]