RSSAll Entries in the "Physician queries" Category

Q&A: Acute pulmonary insufficiency

Have CDI questions?

Have CDI questions?

Q: What should we do about the documentation of “acute pulmonary insufficiency?” What indicators are you using for this in comparison to querying for acute respiratory failure? Acute pulmonary insufficiency is an MCC following surgery but it is also a potential patient safety indicator (PSI) if it’s failure. 

A: Our process is to review the chart and see if it meets clinical evidence for additional specificity such as acute respiratory failure. If it does not, does it meet clinical evidence for acute respiratory distress (now that there is a new code for that condition)? If it does not, then our CDI teams would not query. If it does meet the criteria, we would add all the relevant information from the record on the query and ask the physician if, in his or her medical opinion, the documented acute pulmonary insufficiency could be further specified. [more]

Note from the Associate Editorial Director: Consider the peer audit

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Associate Editorial Director Melissa Varnavas

By Melissa Varnavas

Back in 2015, 40% of ACDIS Radio listeners (of the October 28, 2015, broadcast) indicated their CDI program had an established query auditing process in place. Another 29% said they had some type of query review practices established but they only informally or occasionally take the time to examine the efforts of CDI specialists.

ACDIS has long advocated for some type of regular query practice audit and review—be that driven by the CDI program manager or director or peer-to-peer amongst the CDI team. Donald A. Butler, RN, BSN, then the CDI manager at North Carolina facility authored a White Paper regarding the auditing process and provided an in-depth PowerPoint presentation regarding the benefits back in 2012. In 2013, a number of professionals described the importance of such reviews and pulled the lid off for a glimpse inside their own processes in a CDI Journal article. [more]

Book excerpt: Peer review to ensure compliant query practices

Start your weekend with some CDI reading!

Start your weekend with some CDI reading!

By Marion Kruse, BSN, RN, MBA, and Jennifer Cavagnac, CCDS

Every CDI program should objectively evaluate the outcomes, processes, and compliance of their CDI efforts. Auditing and monitoring provides oversight for the CDI program, insight into physician documentation and collaboration, and objective evaluation of the performance and effectiveness of individual CDI staff members as measured against your facility’s policies and priorities.

According to AHIMA’s “Managing an Effective Query Process” “Healthcare entities should consider establishing an auditing and monitoring program as a means to improve their query processes.” [more]

Q&A: Receiving query responses from providers

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Have CDI questions?

Q: Our hospital is having a hard time getting our physicians to respond to queries, do you have any suggestions on how to get them to reply?

A: The most important thing is make sure the query is concise and contains clinical indicators from the record. You also want to use different methods of contacting the physician as well. Various points of contact include within the electronic health record, via e-mail, by phone, or by having your CDI team visit them on the floor. [more]

Guest Post, Part 2: Where do we stand with clinical validation?

clinical validation poll(1)

According to an ACDIS poll, 70% conduct clinical validation reviews.

By Richard Pinson, MD, FACP, CCS, and Cynthia Tang, RHIA, CCS

At the 2017 ACDIS conference in May, Nelly Leon Chisen, RHIA, director of coding and classification, the executive editor of the American Hospital Association’s (AHA) Coding Clinic provided clarification on the new Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting, I.A.19 titled “Code Assignment and Clinical Criteria.” (Read last week’s post here.) At the meeting, Nelly explained the Guidelines intended to reaffirm long-standing advice that coding must be based on provider documentation, essentially that:

  • Only the physician, or other qualified healthcare practitioner legally accountable for establishing the patient’s diagnosis, can “diagnose” the patient.
  • Clinical information published in Coding Clinic does not constitute clinical criteria for establishing a diagnosis, substitute for the provider’s clinical judgement, or eliminate the need for provider documentation regarding the clinical significance of a patient’s medical condition.

[more]

Guest Post, Part 1: Where do we stand with clinical validation?

clinical validation queries

According to a recent survey, 44.88% send 5 or more clinical validation queries monthly.

By Richard Pinson, MD, FACP, CCS, and Cynthia Tang, RHIA, CCS

The 2017 Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting, effective October 1, 2016, contained a new, perplexing, and problematic section I.A.19 titled “Code Assignment and Clinical Criteria,” which states:

“The assignment of a diagnosis code is based on the provider’s diagnostic statement that the condition exists.  The provider’s statement that the patient has a particular condition is sufficient. Code assignment is not based on clinical criteria used by the provider to establish the diagnosis.”

This has been incorrectly interpreted by some to mean that clinical validation of documented conditions is no longer required for code assignment on claims.

[more]

Q&A: Coding chronic kidney disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus

LauriePrescott_May 2017

Laurie L. Prescott, RN, MSN, CCDS, CDIP, answered this question

Q: Let’s say a provider documented chronic kidney disease (CKD), 2/2 hypertension (HTN), and diabetes mellitus (DM), and the stage of CKD was not specified, but lab results show patient was in stage 2. Could I assign codes for CKD, stage unspecified, Hypertensive CKD w/ stage 1-4, and Type II DM. Do I need to assign a separate code for HTN?

A: Let’s break down the documentation.

CKD secondary to HTN and DM: With this documentation, we have two combination codes to assign—hypertensive CKD and diabetic CKD. We would also assign a code to reflect the stage of the CKD.

[more]

Q&A: Electronic query formatting

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Have CDI questions?

Q: We use an electronic system at our hospital, and find it is difficult to query a physician since we all have our own processes. Would you recommend having a set format for a query that is used electronically?

A: This is going to be contingent on the system your facility uses.

Some EHRs have pretty complex platforms that will allow you to build templates and write a narrative. Here you would write your question, provide all of the appropriate details, and there would be a more formatted, outlined section below where the individual leaving the query can populate the form within that template.

[more]

Summer Reading: Physician Education Discussion Scenarios

LauriePrescott_May 2017

Laurie L. Prescott, MSN, RN, CCDS, CDIP

by Laurie L. Prescott, MSN, RN, CCDS, CDIP

The following clinical scenarios illustrate where clarification would be indicated and include examples of differing communication methods.

Clinical example: The record states the patient was admitted for treatment of pneumonia and the patient was placed on IV antibiotics. A swallow evaluation indicates the patient is at risk for aspiration. The patient is placed on aspiration precautions and thickened liquids. For the coder to assign a code for aspiration pneumonia, the relationship between the pneumonia and aspiration needs to be documented in the record.

Approach #1 (verbal query): “Dr. Smith, I’m Jane from the documentation improvement team. Do you have a minute to work with me? This chart indicates the patient is at risk for aspiration and needs thickened liquids. Could you identify a probable etiology for her pneumonia? The physician responds, “It is probably due to aspiration.” The CDI specialist thanks the physicians and asks, “Could you please clarify that possible cause-and-effect relationship in the record?” She then reminds the physician that “Unlike outpatient coding, the use of possible or probable is permitted and can be coded for inpatient cases.” The physician immediately writes an addendum to his progress note: “Jane, thanks for your help.”  Jane should then document this verbal query and the results as part of the CDI notes for this account. [more]

Q&A: Missing documentation for acute kidney injury

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Q: We are currently coding a chart for an acute kidney injury which has the baseline serum creatinine and urine output missing from the chart. Is there something we can do to identify additional information before we have to query the physician?

[more]