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Linnea Archibald

Linnea Archibald is the CDI editor for the Association of Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists (ACDIS). In this role, she helps out with the website, blog, social media, newsletter, and the CDI Journal. If you have any questions, feel free to email her.

Note from CCDS Coordinator: Do you really need the CCDS certification?

CCDS certification

I received an interesting question recently from someone contemplating Certified Clinical Documentation Specialist (CCDS) certification. She asked:

“I am wondering whether obtaining the certification gives the CCDS holders any special privileges? Are they able to perform duties that they otherwise would not be able to if they did not hold the certification (not by knowledge, but by law)?”

In my five-plus years with ACDIS no one has ever asked this question. Obtaining the CCDS credential does not give the holder any additional rights, privileges, or responsibilities. It does not legally empower the holder to perform any duties.

What the CCDS credential does, however, is recognize individuals who have an advanced level of CDI knowledge and who have the proven ability to work as clinical documentation specialists. Candidates for the CCDS designation are required to have at least two years of experience in the profession.

The CCDS demonstrates an accomplishment that captures both experience and knowledge in the field, and many facilities suggest or require their CDI staff hold the CCDS or earn it following the two-year minimum requirement to sit for the exam, after hire. Facilities often hire individuals with nursing (clinical) or coding experience for the clinical documentation team and train them to become proficient. It is the decision of the individual facility to determine who to employ as a CDI specialist and what responsibilities are given to individuals who perform the CDI role, which may differ depending on whether or not they hold the certification.

What I didn’t tell the writer is that, for a lot of people, CCDS certification is a matter of pride. In the fall of 2016, ACDIS conducted a survey of CCDS holders and asked them what they see as the value of their credential. Their responses included:

  • The credential differentiates me as a leader
  • I am set apart as the CDI who went the extra mile to prepare for and achieve the certification for my very specialized profession
  • I am the go-to-person for others to come to with questions for assistance
  • The credential demonstrates that I put forth the effort to be knowledgeable about the work I perform
  • Professional certification is about promoting the highest standards in our industry
  • Personal satisfaction
  • It shows I take my job seriously and intend to stay on top of the knowledge I need to do the job well
  • It shows I have the experience of clinical chart review for appropriate diagnoses and the clarification/query process to physicians
  • The credential sets me apart—I have skills and knowledge
  • It’s proof that I value this job, want to continue to do it, and want to improve myself; I feel it’s a definite plus and shows that I take pride in what I do.
  • It adds much credibility with the physicians in my institution—I think I am perceived as being more professional and more knowledgeable in my role

From the same survey, several managers told us:

  • Certified individuals are viewed as more knowledgeable about coding guidelines and best practices. They are more committed to their work, better trained, and have better understanding of the role and what is required to do the job well. And because of recertification requirements, they stay current with changes in the industry.
  • Certification holders often serve as team leads, help with new staff orientation, and staff education.
  • It communicates a commitment to their craft. Requirements are such that they have to stay current with on-going changes that are occurring. It helps when interacting with their “customers,” as they really are trained and understand what they are doing.
  • Identifies that you have attained increased knowledge related to your daily practice.

What will drive you to seek CCDS certification? Whether personal pride, or a suggestion or requirement from your employer, we are here to encourage your efforts and cheer your accomplishment.

Visit the ACDIS website and download the Exam Candidate’s Handbook for more information about certification.

Editor’s note: Penny Richards is the CCDS Coordinator for ACDIS. If you have any questions regarding the CCDS credential or exam process, contact her at prichards@hcpro.com.

Q&A: Finding focus for CC/MCC reviews

haik

William Haik, MD, FCCP, CDIP

Editor’s note: William Haik, MD, FCCP, CDIP, director of DRG Review, Inc. answered the following questions in conjunction with his webinar, “FY 2017 ICD-10-CM CC/MCC List with Revisions: Clinical Indicators and Query Opportunities.” To purchase the on-demand version of the webinar, click here. The views expressed do not necessarily represent those of ACDIS or its advisory board.

Q: I’m having trouble with querying physicians for complication codes. Could you please provide guidance?

A: This is difficult. Unless there is an (coding) index directive, query the attending physician to determine if a condition occurring after surgery is due to, or caused by, the surgical procedure (such as atelectasis following surgery). From a medical perspective, the conditions which occur after surgery are not typically due to the surgery, but are due to other factors such as in atelectasis, operative pain, sedation, supine position, etc. Therefore, when I ask, it is when there is a high probability of being related to the surgical procedure (hematoma, excess hemorrhage which is addressed intraoperatively or immediately post-operatively). 

Q: Does systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) with pneumonia qualify for sepsis or should this be queried?

A: Unfortunately, in ICD-10-CM, there is no coding index entry for SIRS, and the previous index entry in ICD-9-CM for SIRS with infection no longer leads to sepsis. Therefore, the physician must be queried to clarify the documentation and assign an appropriate code.

Q: Should we query when the physicians use accelerated or malignant hypertension (HTN) in regards to hypertensive emergency/urgency?

A: Yes, as the former terms now are considered unspecified, a more specific condition should be sought.

Q: Would a physician query be necessary if the physician documentation indicates malnutrition (CC) and the dietician’s assessment documents mild to moderate malnutrition (CC)?

A: It is unnecessary to query a physician regarding the non-specific documentation of malnutrition. If the physician documents mild or moderate malnutrition, one would assign malnutrition, not otherwise specified, unless the physician specifies further.

Q: Do you have any suggestions for what CDI professionals should do if the physician documents a diagnosis but it is not supported by documentation in the chart or by clinical indicators?

A: I would ask the physician to review the record along with enclosed medical criteria regarding the condition in question. I have developed a handbook which provides evidence-based clinical indicators for common medical conditions. (For a copy, email Behaik@aol.com.)

Q: Should we query for electrolyte abnormalities on gastric bypass patients. We are told imbalances are normal due to diet restrictions.

A: Although electrolyte disturbances are common in gastric bypass patients, they are not normal and not integral to the procedure. The physician would typically would treated the patient if the levels were significantly clinically deranged. In this setting, I would query the attending physician to determine if the levels are merely lab abnormalities or if they should be clinically significant and reportable.

Q: When acute respiratory failure is reported in the postop period and is integral to the procedure (for example, the patient remains on mechanical ventilation for less than two days following post op), do we have to query to see if it is significant or should we code without a query?

A: From a clinical perspective, I assume major surgery (cardiopulmonary, esophageal, gastrointestinal resection surgery) often require prolonged ventilation. In minor surgeries, such as prostate biopsies, extremity surgeries, etc., if the patient is on mechanical ventilation longer than 24-hours and assuming the patient is awake, then I would tend to query regarding post-operative respiratory failure, particularly if there is a medical complication such as aspiration pneumonia, pulmonary edema, etc.

Q: What’s the difference between acute respiratory failure and acute pulmonary insufficiency? Would oxygen dependent Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) be insufficiency instead of failure?

A: Acute respiratory failure is a life-threatening condition which is typified by a pO2 of less than 60 on room air (in patients with previously normal lungs) in the clinical situation of a patient with rapid respirations and increased work of breathing in the acute setting. Acute pulmonary/respiratory insufficiency is a poorly defined term merely meaning non-life-threatening impairment of gas exchange. Therefore, it does not represent a pO2 of less than 60 (in patients with previously normal lungs), but not a completely normal pO2. Oxygen-dependent COPD is consistent with chronic respiratory failure as to obtain oxygen (via Medicare) one must have a pO2 of less than 60.

Q: Post-operative pulmonary insufficiency is an MCC, but post-operative respiratory insufficiency is neither a CC/MCC. Is there a way to differentiate these two diagnoses?

A: There is no medical differentiation between pulmonary and respiratory insufficiency. This is merely an idiosyncrasy of ICD-10-CM.

Q: According to resources, a lactate less than 1.0mmol/L, which is normal, is considered a sepsis indicator. Why is this an appropriate indicator if it is within normal limits rather than greater than 2 which is abnormal?

A: Despite the “normal” limits of lactate up to 2.2 in most hospitals, it has been determined, retroactively, a lactic acid level of greater than 1 is a finding seen in sepsis. It is not specific as there are other hypoperfusion states and/or chronic liver disease which may result in an elevated lactic acid level. Therefore, it must only be interpreted in the appropriate clinical circumstances.

Q: Is healthcare associated pneumonia (HCAP) synonymous with hospital acquired pneumonia?

A: They are similar, but not synonymous. HCAP includes nursing homes, long-term acute care facilities, chemotherapy, and dialysis centers. Hospital-acquired pneumonia requires a hospitalization of at least a three-day stay. The pathogenic organisms are similar as is the treatment.

Book Excerpt: Teamwork makes the dream work

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Elizabeth Lamkin, MHA, ACHE

by Elizabeth Lamkin, MHA, ACHE

CDI specialists do not work alone. They form a team with case management (CM) and physicians for concurrent documentation analysis and improvement. The case manager advises the physician on patient status, the CDI specialist ensures the documentation reflects the status and care, and the physician advisor is there to support CM and CDI if there is conflict with a physician or clinical staff. The physician advisor can take advantage of every interaction to transform potential conflicts into teaching opportunities.

For example, a patient is scheduled for surgery as an outpatient but the surgery is on the inpatient-only list (CMS, OPPS final rule, 2016). The surgery scheduling department checks the inpatient-only list and notifies the physician that CM is going to review for status. The surgery department then alerts registration, which notifies the CM, who checks to make sure all requirements for the inpatient surgery are met. The CM advises the physician on correct status and, ideally, the physician follows the CM’s advice.

The CDI specialist checks the documentation for compliance and coding, and queries the physician if the documentation is incomplete. If the surgeon refuses to change or complete the documentation, the CDI specialist escalates the issue to the physician advisor. The physician advisor contacts the physician and explains the reasons for inpatient status and additional documentation. The surgeon completes the documentation as requested. If these steps are completed, coding and billing will clearly know what claim to drop without requiring a bill hold and clinical review.

Additionally, this three-part team of CDI specialist, CM, and physician advisor are able to gather real-time feedback on whether the electronic health record (EHR) is user-friendly, and report findings back to the executive team and IT. In some cases, problems with the EHR are simply user error or lack of training, and the CDI specialist can play a role in teaching providers to use the EHR.

Throughout this process, the HIM department works with CDI and supports physicians through functions such as timely transcription and ensuring chart completeness. Together, CDI and HIM look to ensure appropriate orders, signatures, and all required elements of the medical record. This includes ICD-10 coding and documentation to monitor ICD-10 compliance. HIM has traditionally been responsible for the organization of the medical record but now must have a collaborative relationship with IT and the EHR vendor to ensure the record works well for all stakeholders.

Finally, HIM will also review the medical record upon discharge for completeness. The next step is to code the record for payment. If all the previous steps in revenue cycle have occurred correctly—required forms are in place, patient status is clearly documented with a care plan, and discharge status is clear and accurate—then the coders should have all the elements needed for accurate coding. There should be very few physician queries from HIM if coding is clearly supported through documentation. Getting all of this right while the patient is in the hospital will facilitate accurate coding and produce a clean claim to avoid back-end corrections and delayed billing.

Editor’s note: This article is adapted from The Revenue Integrity Training Toolkit by Elizabeth Lamkin, MHA, ACHE. Lamkin is CEO of PACE Healthcare Consulting and specializes in system development, quality and billing compliance. The views expressed do not necessarily represent those of ACDIS or its advisory board.

Guest Post: Postoperative complication coding and value-based purchasing

by Ghazal Irfan, RHIA

Achieving compliant coding

Postoperative complication coding guidelines continue to cause difficulties for coders and CDI professionals. So, let’s analyze the steps needed to ensure complete, accurate, and compliant coding.

The first step in compliance is defining a postoperative complication. In general, a postoperative complication is an unanticipated outcome (in the form of a condition or a disease) that develops following an illness, treatment, or procedure.

For example, a 60-year-old female comes in for a herniorrhaphy (hernia repair). She has a past medical history of hypertension and morbid obesity with body mass index greater than 40. She smokes and has chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Surgery goes well; however, post-surgery, the patient has a hard time weaning off of the ventilator and is immediately given inhaler treatments and placed on BiPAP. After a couple of incentive spirometry sessions and inhaler treatments, the patient feels better, and she is discharged home the following day.

The body of the operative report documents the patient’s inability to breathe on her own due to “acute respiratory insufficiency following extubation.” The header of the operative report, however, documents no complications. How should acute respiratory insufficiency following extubation be coded? Should it be coded as a “postoperative complication,” or as an “acute respiratory insufficiency?”

The ICD-10-CM Official Guidelines for Coding and Reporting states that “code assignment is based on the provider’s documentation of the relationship between the condition and the care or procedure. The guideline extends to any complications of care, regardless of the chapter the code is located in.”

The Guidelines go on to explain that “it is important to note that not all conditions that occur during or following medical care or surgery are classified as complications. There must be a cause-and-effect relationship between the care provided and the condition, and an indication in the documentation that it is a complication. Query the provider for clarification if the complication is not clearly documented.”

Keeping these rules in mind, a coder cannot report the diagnosis as a postoperative complication due to the legal ramifications of these codes, and due to the conflicting documentation: acute respiratory insufficiency following extubation versus no complication.

When to query

While deciding on a secondary diagnosis, coders and CDI specialists need to ask questions like:

  • “Was the condition clinically evaluated, tested, and treated?”
  • “Did the condition result in extended length of stay?”
  • “Did the condition require increased nursing care?”

Patients who are smokers with COPD and morbid obesity have a hard time clearing their lungs of carbon dioxide and need a little help to get the gas exchange going. Since a coder/CDI specialist is not a doctor and cannot assume a cause-and-effect relationship, the coding guidelines will direct them to query the physician regarding postoperative complication.

The following query form can be used for any postoperative complication clarification and should be made part of the legal medical record.

query

Chances are, an inexperienced coder will look at the operative report, assign the postoperative complication code as not present on admission (POA-N), and drop the chart. Such an assignment negatively affects the facility’s quality outcomes report since postoperative complication codes with POA N are counted as the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s patient safety indicators. A seasoned coder/CDI specialist, however, would submit a query and ask for clarification. Accurate, complete, and compliant coding can only be achieved when coders and CDI specialists have leadership support and physician buy-in. Coders need education on the significance of reaching out to physicians when coding postoperative complications, and when documentation is conflicting or inconsistent, even though the DRG stays the same.

Also, managers should not penalize coders for holding charts or failing to meet productivity benchmarks when pursuing a clarification. Code assignment affects reimbursement, quality outcome reporting under the VBP program, and academic research programs. Working collaboratively—coders, CDI professionals, and physicians—can assist facilities in gathering the most complete and accurate data sets, which will result in valid, ethical, and reliable quality outcomes reporting.

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared in JustCoding. Irfan is the coding compliance manager of hospital services for RevWorks AH-Corp and works with her team to ensure revenue cycle compliance. She holds a degree in health information management and is pursuing a master’s degree in biomedical informatics at Oregon Health and Science University. Opinions expressed are that of the author and do not represent HCPro or ACDIS.

Note from the Associate Director: Thanks for the memories—see you in Chicago for Outpatient CDI!

By Rebecca Hendren

And just like that, three days of education, network, and frivolity have come to an end. This year’s ACDIS Conference was our biggest and best yet. We were excited to celebrate our 10th anniversary with some extra Vegas sparkle and a chance to reminisce over how ACDIS—and the whole CDI profession—has grown over the last 10 years.

Some of the highlights for me were, as always, meeting so many dedicated CDI professionals and seeing the amazing connections that developed between you all. It warms my heart to see folks pour out of a session and stand chatting in hallways about the information they just learned, or huddle over laptops on the floor as they share best practices.

Thank you to the individuals who participated in the various focus groups held during the conference. The conversations had in those rooms and the perspectives shared will be considered over the next weeks and months and result in process improvements or new product development. A direct result of us coming together for four days of learning.

It wouldn’t be the ACDIS conference without plenty of laughs. Laurie Prescott and Shannon McCall did not disappoint as they reenacted the Family Feud gameshow to teach us the value of interdepartmental communication and not a few solid tips for both new and seasoned CDI professionals. We all had a chuckle at Brian Murphy’s cheesy jokes during the Meet ACDIS session where we discussed all the things ACDIS does and the many benefits of membership.

And all of you made me laugh every day with the good humor with which you tackle such complicated topics that have incredibly important results. ACDIS attendees have the most positive attitudes and can-do spirit of any group of professionals I’ve ever engaged with. It is heartening and inspiring and I know you are all returning to your workplaces with renewed pep and vigor, just like I am.

Finally, I hope to see many of you in Chicago in September for our inaugural ACDIS Symposium: Outpatient CDI. Join us for two days of education and networking dedicated to the fastest growing area of CDI: the outpatient setting. We’ll have two concurrent tracks with diverse sessions for both leaders/managers and clinical chart reviewers, including how to get started in the ambulatory setting, query techniques and nuances, metrics and analytics, staffing training, and demonstrating return on investment.

We hope you join us for two days of actionable strategies and unparalleled networking. All with the distinct ACDIS flair that you know and love!

Editor’s note: Hendren is the Associate Director of Product Development and Membership for ACDIS. Contact her at rhendren@acdis.org

 

 

 

Conference Corner: Thanks to our exhibitors and sponsors

ACDIS would like to take a few moments to recognize and thank all our sponsors and exhibitors of the 2017 10th annual ACDIS conference. Every year, our sponsors and exhibitors help us make the conference memorable. Thank you for helping us make the 10th annual conference the best yet!

The following is a comprehensive list of all our sponsors:

  • Title sponsor: MedPartners
  • Diamond sponsors: Optum360 (also sponsor of the 10th anniversary photo booth), Enjoin, TrustHCS, UASI
  • Platinum sponsors: 3M, Iodine, Sound Physicians Advisory Services
  • Conference specific sponsors: ChartWise, tote bag sponsor; Elsevier, welcome reception sponsor; HCTec, water bottle sponsor, The Claro Group, app sponsor; Harmony Healthcare, door cling sponsor

The following is a comprehensive list of all our exhibitors (in alphabetical order):

ACDIS Lee Health
Administrative Consulting Service (ACS) Libman Education
Addison Group M*Modal
American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) Managed Resources Inc.
Altegra Health Solutions Maxim Healthcare Services
American Medical Association MedeAnalytics
BRG Healthcare nThrive
Brundage Medical Group Nuance
Caban Resources Ovation Healthcare Technology
CDI Search Group Oxford Healthcare Technology
CDIMD-ePreOP Peak Health Solutions
Chartwise Medical Systems, Inc. Pinson & Tang
ClinIntell, Inc. RecordsOne, LLC
ComforceHealth Saince, Inc.
Dolbey SCL Health
e4 SoftScript Transcription
Elite Medical Staffing Sound Physicians
ezDI Inc. Streamline Health Solutions
Feel Good Inc. Tenet Healthcare
GeBBS Healthcare Solutions Universal Coding Solutions
H3.Group Vincari
HCTec VitalWare
Huron Consulting Washington & West, LLC
Intellis

Conference Corner: ACDIS honors achievement award winners at annual conference

ACDIS honored the nation’s top CDI professionals at its 10th annual conference in Las Vegas, Nevada, on May 10, including:

  • Nicole Kosiba, RN, BSN, CDI specialist at Advocate Health Care – Illinois Masonic Hospital in Chicago, with the Rookie of the Year award

    Koisiba

    Nicole Kosiba, RN, BSN

  • Nicole Fox, MD, MPH, FACS, CPE, medical director of CDI and of pediatric trauma at Cooper University Health System in Camden, New Jersey, with the Excellence in Provider Engagement award

    Fox

    Nicole Fox, MD, MPH, FACS, CPE

  • Fran Jurcak, MSN, RN, CCDS, director of clinical innovations at Iodine Software in Austin, Texas, with the Recognition of CDI Professional Achievement award

    Jurcak

    Fran Jurcak, MSN, RN, CCDS

  • Rita Fields, BSN, RN, CCDS, regional CDI manager at Baptist Health in Louisville, Kentucky, with the 2017 CDI Professional of the Year award

    Fields

    Rita Fields, BSN, RN, CCDS

ACDIS Director Brian Murphy presented the four awards in the morning’s general session to kick off the 10th annual conference. The awards were presented in front of an audience of more than 2,000 of the winner’s peers.

The Rookie of the Year award (a 2016 addition) recognizes the rapid growth of the CDI profession by awarding an outstanding CDI professional on the job less than two years at the time of nomination. The Excellence in Provider Engagement award (a 2016 addition) recognizes a professional who has made measurable impacts engaging providers (physicians, nurses, and others) in the need for accurate and complete documentation in the health record. The Recognition of CDI Professional Achievement award recognizes a professional who has made outstanding achievements within his or her facility, and the CDI Professional of the Year award is ACDIS’ top honor, given to a CDI professional who has made significant contributions within his or her organization and to the broader CDI community.

“We had a very impressive pool of candidates this year. The 2017 Conference Committee had some difficult decisions to make. But in the end they selected four winners who exemplify all the qualities that make for great CDI professionals—the initiative to step outside their comfort zones and advance the profession, the ability to lead others and lead by example, the willingness to work as part of a team with HIM/coding professionals, physicians, and others, and above all a passion for what they do and the CDI profession as a whole,” says ACDIS Director Brian Murphy.

“The hardest thing was that each of the nominees had done such tremendous work in their own respect, but there could only be one winner for each category. […] Just to be on that nominee list, you must have done something wonderful, but I’m very, very confident that people will agree with our choices. The work the winners have done has been stellar, to say the least,” says Faisal Hussain, MD, a member of the 2017 Conference Committee.

“It was really difficult, but I think the process went pretty smoothly. All of the nominees were excellent. It’s very difficult to choose because you hate to have to say no to anyone when they’re all so close to the top of the list. It was great to see the number of nominations, though. The people who supported the nominees put in so much work to do that!” adds Jeanne O’Connor, RN, MS, CCDS, another member of the 2017 Conference Committee.

To read more about the ACDIS Achievement Awards criteria, award descriptions, and selection process, click here.

Conference Corner: How to use the new ACDIS bookstore booth

Those who’ve attended multiple conferences may recall the previous ACDIS bookstore booth as a pretty hectic place, both for the attendees and the staff involved. With those memories in mind, the ACDIS team worked to redesign the booth for this year’s conference.

The booth has three distinct areas: one for browsing and asking questions, one for purchasing your books, and one to demo our e-learning courses and chat with our sales staff. This layout will streamline the experience of shopping at the booth for everyone involved.

Please take a few moments to review the following steps to ensure you know how the booth setup works.

  1. First, head over to the tables at the booth to browse the book and product selections. ACDIS team members will be present to answer any questions you might have.

    step 1

    Step 1: Choose your books

  1. After you’ve selected which books to purchase, head over to the checkout area. Once there, tell the staff member which book(s) you’d like. They’ll retrieve them from the bookshelves and you can pay right there.

    step 2

    Step 2: Make your purchase

  1. To demo a CDI e-learning course or chat with one of our sales reps, head on over to the final area of the booth.

    step 3

    Step 3: Chat with a sales rep and demo our e-learning

If you have any questions about the booth setup while at the conference, head on over. The staff is happy to help walk you through the process.

 

Conference Corner: Getting from place-to-place in Las Vegas

The 10th annual ACDIS conference starts this week. To help you prepare for your travel to Las Vegas, we’ve put together a few transportation options from McCarran International Airport to the MGM Grand Hotel, the location of the conference. While ACDIS does not provide attendees with transportation to and from the conference, we did want to provide a resource to help you find the options in one place.

Taxi and car services

The MGM Grand is actually only a little more than two miles away from the airport itself. There are five different taxi cab services from the airport to hotels in Vegas, some of which are cash only. It’s recommended that passengers ask prior to getting into the cab whether or not they accept credit cards. There is also a $2.00 additional charge on all taxi fares originating at the airport.

The taxis are available outside Terminals 1 and 3 and at the Rent-A-Car Center at the airport. For more information regarding the taxi services provided from McCarran airport, click here.

In addition to the taxicabs, there are four different limousine car services operating out of the airport if you want to travel in a bit more luxury for those two miles. For information on this option, click here.

The MGM Grand also has a town car service through Executive Transportation. For more information about the hotel’s service, click here.

Airport shuttles

While the hotel does not provide a free shuttle to guests, there are a number of affordable options for airport shuttles.

The first option is through Executive Transportation, working with the MGM Grand. A one way-ticket to or from the airport on this shuttle is $7.00 per person. To make a reservation from the airport, contact Executive Transportation at 702-646-4661 or info@executivelasvegas.com. To make a reservation back to the airport at the end of the conference, simply see the MGM Grand Concierge.

BellTrans Charter Shuttle also operates between the airport and the MGM Grand. Each shuttle holds up to 24 passengers and makes three to five stops at various hotels. Their rates are $14-$17, round trip, depending on the hotel destination. To book a spot, visit their website by clicking here.

SuperShuttle also offers an airport shuttle to any destination on the Vegas Strip. If you’re traveling in a group, you can book transportation at a group price. To make a reservation, contact them at 800-258-3826. For information about group transportation, click here.

Ride Share

Uber and Lyft ride sharing also provide service to and from McCarran airport. Like the taxi services, the ride share vehicle operate out of Terminals 1 and 3. To make a reservation, download either app to your smart phone and request a ride. For more information about Uber, click here. For more information about Lyft, click here.

The MGM Grand also offers a discount for guests who choose Uber. By using the promo cod “MGMGRAND2,” you’ll get your first ride (up to $20) for free.

Driving

For those of you who live locally or are driving from the airport, make sure to use the address 3799 South Las Vegas Boulevard, Las Vegas, Nevada 89109.

The McCarran Rent-A-Car center is located at 7135 Gilespie Street. An airport shuttle bus departs approximately every five minutes from Terminal 3 to the rental center. Due to road construction, the shuttle bus takes approximately 30 minutes to reach the rental center.

Parking

Hourly self-parking rates at the hotel are as follows:

  • 1-2 hours: $7
  • 2-4 hours: $10
  • 4-24 hours: $12
  • Over 24 hours: $12 per additional day or fraction thereof

Hourly valet parking rates at the hotel are as follows:

  • 0-4 hours: $15
  • 4-24 hours: $20
  • Over 24 hours: $20 per additional day or fraction thereof

Editor’s note: For additional transportation from the airport and around Las Vegas, please visit the MGM Grand Hotel’s website.

Conference Corner: ACDIS office closed for the 10th annual conference

office closure

ACDIS office closed May 8-12

The annual ACDIS conference will be the blowout CDI event of the year, as always, but with a special flair for the 10th anniversary festivities. Because of the size and reach of the conference, all the ACDIS staff needs to devote their full attention on the conference. This means the ACDIS office will be closed starting on May 8 and reopening on May 12.

While the ACDIS team will be busy in Las Vegas making the conference as memorable and helpful as possible for the attendees, customer service remains open for questions. Please contact Customer Service at customerservice@hcpro.com or call 800-650-6787 for any of the following concerns:

  • Requests for a receipt
  • Assistance with your username and/or password
  • Questions about ACDIS website access
  • Inquiries about your ACDIS membership expiration date

Should you have other questions, the ACDIS team will do their best to answer promptly upon returning to the office on May 12.

We look forward to seeing everyone in Vegas!