March 13, 2017 | | Comments 0
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Note from the Director: CDI success requires more than a credential

Which credential/certification/licensure makes for the best CDI specialist? RN? RHIA? MD?

If you answered all of the above—or none of the above—you’re on the right track, according to a new Position Paper written by the ACDIS Advisory Board published on the ACDIS website.

To be blunt, no licensure or credential can identify whether someone will succeed as a CDI specialist. Not even ACDIS’ own Certified Clinical Documentation Specialist (CCDS) certification can guarantee that. We do, however, require anyone who sits for the CCDS exam to have two years of experience as a CDI specialist, so we feel good about the competency of our CCDS-credentialed professionals. CCDS holders must understand the basic core competencies and have demonstrated their skills in the field already.

But is that person a guaranteed fit with your culture?

Is that person dependent on an encoder or other computer assisted coding/natural language processing (CAC/NLP) tool that your hospital does not have?

There are many other factors that make up a good CDI specialist. As the new Position Paper explains, these factors include:

  • Effective verbal and written communication
  • Self-directed with an ability to work independently to complete the work at hand
  • The ability to think critically
  • A commitment to lifelong learning

The new Position Paper also notes that a strong clinical foundation is a must for any CDI specialist, and hiring an RN, MD, or an RHIA with strong clinical acumen will certainly fulfill that requirement. But, it’s no guarantee of success as the paper states:

“Credentials do not guarantee whether one will succeed as a CDI professional. Credentials merely identify the body of knowledge in which that person was originally trained. Prior bodies of knowledge certainly assist one’s success, and credentials and/or licensure provide identification of one’s stated profession and their level of education or achievement, but they do not ensure CDI competence. There is a number of necessary skills that cannot be ensured or captured by a credential.

It always comes down to the person. Why should CDI be any different?

If you’re wondering whether a Position Paper represents ACDIS’ official stance on an issue, you can find the answer here. Our recently published “Hierarchy of Authority” explains the order of significance of our published articles. ACDIS Positon Papers are peer-reviewed and represent the consensus opinion of the advisory board. We hope you find “ACDIS’ ‘Hierarchy of Authority’ of published articles” helpful as you navigate our website.

Editor’s note: This article originally appeared in CDI Strategies. Brian Murphy is the director of the Association of Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists. Contact him at bmurphy@acdis.org.

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Filed Under: ACDISAdvisory BoardCDI ProfessionCertificationClinical Documentation Improvement

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Linnea Archibald About the Author: Linnea Archibald is the CDI editor for the Association of Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists (ACDIS). In this role, she helps out with the website, blog, social media, newsletter, and the CDI Journal. If you have any questions, feel free to email her.

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