February 24, 2012 | | Comments 0
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Maybe, possibly, definitely: Stay informed regarding ICD-10 delay

Which countdown to ICD-10 calendar will you use?

On February 14, CMS acting administrator Marilyn Tavenner told American Medical Association (AMA) meeting attendees that CMS would “reexamine” the timeline for ICD-10-CM/PCS implementation. Tavenner offered no details, just the vague possibility of potential reconsideration.

The healthcare industry jumped with the news.

American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) immediately published a release urging healthcare professionals to move forward with their ICD-10 implementation and training plans, and downplayed the announcement, pointing its vague language.

“This is a promise from CMS to examine the timeline, not to change it,” said Dan Rode, MBA, CHPS, FHFMA, vice president for advocacy and policy at AHIMA, in the release. “But government officials are sending mixed signals that many in the healthcare community will interpret as a reason for delay.”

The AMA celebrated.

“The timing of the ICD-10 transition could not be worse for physicians as they are spending significant financial and administrative resources implementing electronic health records in their practices and trying to comply with multiple quality and health information technology programs that include penalties for noncompliance,” wrote Peter W. Carmel, MD, AMA president in a February 16 release. “Burdens on physician practices need to be reduced—not created—as the nation’s health care system undertakes significant payment and delivery reforms.”

The very next day, February 15, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius said “the federal government will delay for an unspecified time the implementation date for the ICD-10 diagnostic and procedural coding system,” HealthLeaders Media reported.

Specifically, the HHS release stated that the agency “will initiate a process” to delay the ICD-10 implementation date for “certain health care entities.”

And that was pretty much it.

The rest of the release reiterates that the provider community feels burdened by the ICD-10 implementation, but also reiterates the importance of the move to ICD-10 because it will “provide more robust and specific data that will help improve patient care.”

Meanwhile, CMS confirmed to ACDIS’ parent company HCPro Inc., that the agency will use the rulemaking process when revisiting the ICD-10 implementation timeline; a process known to be lengthy, a process that does not always furnishes an expected result (meaning after the rulemaking CMS may just decide to keep the implementation date firm).

So multiple experts from ACDIS Advisory Board members to AHIMA directors repeated the refrain,; “Stay the course with ICD-10 implementation.”

I’m on their side.

In a phone conversation earlier this week, an ACDIS member told me that she was glad to hear CMS delayed ICD-10 by two years. Two years, she said.

Of course, I asked where she got her information and she cited some reputable sources which, on closer examination, actually said nothing of the sort.

All this commotion—all this maybe, possibly, definitely thinking about it—may ultimately cause serious difficulties for those in the midst of ICD-10 implementation plans. The possible delay could cause facility administrators to pull back the purse strings on training funds. Programs could decide to delay important technology purchases to save money since the implementation date isn’t imminent.

Meanwhile, we hear how far behind facilities actually are in their ICD-10 planning. CDI staff (according to a recent survey) say they do not even know if a ICD-10 implementation committee is meeting at their facility or what will be expected of them as the coming change draws near. Possibly postponing the actual “go-live” date only adds to facility procrastination on these issues.

The more advanced facilities have already evaluated their staffing needs in terms of CDI specialists’ concurrent record reviews and coding needs. These facilities have already budgeted for additional employees and charted a course for staff member training beginning with anatomy and physiology. Even more advance programs have already begun reviewing their top MS-DRGs for documentation improvement opportunities related to ICD-10.

History may prove me wrong (especially as rumors also abound about HHS opting to skip ICD-10 and jump directly to ICD-11!) but I remain convinced that ICD-10 implementation is inevitable and that the sooner facilities prepare themselves the better.

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Filed Under: ICD-10

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Melissa Varnavas About the Author: Melissa Varnavas, is the Associate Director of the Association of Clinical Documentation Improvement Specialists (ACDIS). ACDIS is a community in which CDI professionals share the latest tested tips, tools, and strategies to implement successful CDI programs and achieve professional growth. With more than 4,000 members, its mission is to bring CDI specialists together. To learn more about ACDIS, go to www.cdiassociation.com or call HCPro customer service at 800-650-6787.

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